Menu Close

Articles on Housing costs

Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 articles

A mural by Amanda Newman in Northcote, Melbourne, depicts Ai Fen, a Wuhan Central Hospital doctor who was reprimanded for raising the alarm about COVID-19 in December 2019. Photo: Carl Grodach

Why coronavirus will deepen the inequality of our suburbs

The inner suburbs are home to large numbers of workers in jobs vulnerable to the pandemic. If they're forced to seek cheaper housing in outer suburbs, the urban divide will widen.
The damaging effects of housing disadvantage on people’s mental health can persist even years after their housing situation improves. Lovely Bird/Shutterstock

Poor housing leaves its mark on our mental health for years to come

The difficulties for people facing housing disadvantage don't end as soon as their situation improves. They are at higher risk of poorer mental health years or even decades later.
Some children in New Zealand live in such hardship that they don’t have a good pair of shoes and have to put up with feeling cold. from www.shutterstock.com

New Zealand’s dismal record on child poverty and the government’s challenge to turn it around

The New Zealand government has set targets for reducing child poverty, but with hundreds of thousands of children living in poverty, this goal remains a challenge.
The housing boom increased wealth gains for affluent households while rising housing costs undermined income gains for less affluent households. Sam Mooy/AAP

How the housing boom has driven rising inequality

The Productivity Commission neglected the impact of housing costs. After allowing for these costs, the top 10% of households' average disposable income grew at 2.7 times the rate of the bottom 10%.
A tiny house in the backyard appeals to some as a solution that offers both affordability and sustainability. Think Out Loud/flick

Interest in tiny houses is growing, so who wants them and why?

New research has found a marked increase in people, particularly among women over 50, who are building or want to build a tiny house. However, inflexible planning rules often stand in their way.
Add up all the neglected costs of downsizing and retirees have good reason to be wary of making the move. wavebreakmedia from www.shutterstock.com

Downsizing cost trap awaits retirees – five reasons to be wary

Retirees are often urged to downsize to free up suburban properties for the next generation and for higher-density development. What's being ignored is the costs of moving into a unit or apartment.
Margaret Morton’s photographs of the homeless highlighted their makeshift dwellings as symbols of creativity and resourcefulness. © Margaret Morton

How the homeless create homes

Even though they don't consistently have a roof over their heads, the homeless do their best to create a routine, form communities and make a home – just like the rest of society.
How much of co-housing is shared space is up to residents.

Co-housing works well for older people, once they get past the image problem

Older Australians are keenly aware of the housing challenges they face, but most are wary of co-housing due to the negative associations of shared living spaces.
Low-cost housing development on the city outskirts can expose owners to higher costs in the long run. Paul Miller/AAP

Affordable housing is not just about the purchase price

People are taking on larger future risks and costs just so they can buy a house. Increases in new home owners are seen as a positive development, but what if they can't afford the ongoing costs?
The growing numbers of pensioners in private rental accommodation use much of their income to pay for housing. Alan Porritt/AAP

Why secure and affordable housing is an increasing worry for age pensioners

For the increasing proportion of people living in private rental accommodation who can expect to be dependent on the age pension, the prospects of financial and housing insecurity are grim.
The issue of child poverty and its links to housing costs are not widely acknowledged in Australia. from www.shutterstock.com

By 2030, ‘no Australian child will be living in poverty’ – why can’t we promise that?

Income poverty statistics tell us relatively little about why Australian children live in poverty, or how to alleviate it. But housing plays a critical part in the problem.

Top contributors

More