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Articles on Human-wildlife conflict

Displaying 1 - 20 of 46 articles

A red-tailed hawk with a broken wing at the New England Wildlife Center in Weymouth, Mass. John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Digitized records from wildlife centers show the most common ways that humans harm wild animals

Hundreds of wildlife rehabilitation centers across the US and Canada treat sick and injured animals and birds. Digitizing their records is yielding valuable data on human-wildlife encounters.
Habitat loss has driven Asian elephants, like these foraging at a garbage dump in Sri Lanka, into human areas. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP via Getty Images

Human activities in Asia have reduced elephant habitat by nearly two-thirds since 1700, dividing what remains into ever-smaller patches

A new study looks back into history to assess human impacts on the range of Asian elephants and finds sharp decline starting several centuries ago.
Red knots stop to feed along the Delaware shore as they migrate from the high Arctic to South America. Gregory Breese, USFWS/Flickr

Protecting 30% of Earth’s surface for nature means thinking about connections near and far

Governments, scientists and conservation groups are working to protect 30% of Earth’s land and water for nature by 2030. Two scientists explain why scale matters for reaching that goal.
Photographing a bear in Yellowstone National Park at a distance the National Park Service calls safe – at least 100 yards from a predator. Jim Peaco, NPS/Flickr

Making room for wildlife: 4 essential reads

The recent goring of a tourist who approached within 10 feet of a bison in Yellowstone National Park is a reminder that wild animals can be dangerous and people should keep safe distances.

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