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Articles on Ice Age

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The Perito Moreno glacier in Patagonia. The sheer number of seracs gives the impression that the glacier’s surface is covered in dragon scales. Olivier Dangles/IRD

In praise of glaciers, those dragons of ice viewed with concern and fascination

The parable of the dragons underlines the need to apprehend glacier disappearance in a transdisciplinary way, to create a dialogue between the physical, ecological and philosophical sciences.
A glacial depositional feature – an erratic – is a large rock that has been ‘bull-dozed’ and deposited by a moving glacier. Elizabeth Rudolph

Marion Island’s last ice age happened earlier than we thought. Why it matters

These findings are in stark contrast with the original worldview that suggested the entire globe was at a maximum glaciated state around 20 000 years ago.
Surface detail of the Tomanowos meteorite, showing cavities produced by dissolution of iron. Eden, Janine and Jim/Wikipedia

Tomanowos, the meteorite that survived mega-floods and human folly

Tomanowos, aka the Willamette Meteorite, may be the world's most interesting rock. Its story includes catastrophic ice age floods, theft of Native American cultural heritage and plenty of human folly.
This hunting scene, painted 44,000 years ago, is the oldest known work of representational art in the world. Ratno Sardi

Indonesian cave paintings show the dawn of imaginative art and human spiritual belief

A recent cave art discovery in remote Indonesia is changing our understanding of the beginnings of art and the emergence of religious-like thinking in the early human story.
Since the industrial revolution began in the mid-1700s, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have gone up by 46%. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why we won’t be heading into an ice age any time soon

For the past two and a half million years, Earth has experienced regular ice ages, but with carbon dioxide levels now over 400 parts per million, the next ice age is postponed for a very long time.
The now-extinct giant beaver once lived from Florida to Alaska. It weighed as much as 100 kilograms, roughly the same as a small black bear. Illustrated by Luke Dickey/Western University

Why giant human-sized beavers died out 10,000 years ago

Scientists studied the fossilized bones of giant beavers to understand what they ate and whether the species could keep up with environmental change.
Droplets rising from the Champagne vent on the ocean floor in the Mariana Islands. Fluids venting from the site contain dissolved carbon dioxide. NOAA Ocean Explorer

Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth – could it happen again?

Thousands of years ago, carbon gases trapped on the seafloor escaped, causing drastic warming that helped end the last ice age. A scientist says climate change could cause this process to repeat.

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