Articles on Immigration courts

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Immigrant children separated from their parents who were detained at the U.S.-Mexico border arrive at a foster care facility in East Harlem on June 22. Rainmaker Photo/MediaPunch /IPX

For many immigrant families, the fight for reunification is just beginning

History shows that the US court system isn't sympathetic to undocumented migrants when it comes to parental rights.
Immigration proceedings look a lot like criminal trials, with immigrants often brought in handcuffed. Reuters/Reade Levinson

How immigration court works

The attorney general can decide immigration cases because immigration courts are part of the DOJ, not the judiciary. This congested system has 345,000 open cases. Most will likely end in deportation.
A man has his fingerprints scanned by a U.S. Border Patrol agent while others wait their turn. Reuters/Jeff Topping

Is the US immigration court system broken?

The system is backlogged and inefficient. Trump's commitment to strict immigration enforcement will likely make the problem worse.

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