Articles on Indigenous

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People gather in Edmonton during a rally in response to Gerald Stanley’s acquittal in the shooting death of Colten Boushie. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Broken system: Why is a quarter of Canada’s prison population Indigenous?

Colten Boushie's death and the subsequent acquittal of his killer has fuelled loud calls for reforms to Canada's criminal justice system and its treatment of the Indigenous. Why has it taken so long?
A team of researchers in northern Australia have documented kites and falcons, “firehawks,” intentionally carrying burning sticks to spread fire: It is just one example of western science catching up to Indigenous Traditional Knowledge. James Padolsey/Unsplash

It’s taken thousands of years, but Western science is finally catching up to Traditional Knowledge

A double standard exists concerning the acceptance of Traditional Knowledge by practitioners of Western science.
Harley Windsor’s visibility before, during and after these Winter Olympics may just be the catalyst to inspire future generations of Indigenous athletes. AAP/Brendan Esposito

In Harley Windsor, Australia has its first Indigenous Winter Olympian – why has it taken so long?

While Harley Windsor’s selection deserves celebration, it’s surprising that it has taken until now for an Indigenous Australian to compete at a Winter Olympics.
Colten Boushie’s uncle, Alvin Baptiste, and his brother Jace Boushie address demonstrators gathered outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask.,on Feb.10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

‘Clearing the plains’ continues with the acquittal of Gerald Stanley

It's time for an overhaul of the justice system in Canada: How juries are selected, how Indigenous victims are treated and to challenge embedded racism within police forces and courts.
Dr. Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, has called on the federal government to stop its chronic underfunding of services for Indigenous children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canada guilty of forging crisis in Indigenous foster care

No project for reconciliation can succeed unless the federal and provincial governments roll back their power and create space for Indigenous control over their own self-determining futures.
Members of the James Bay Cree gather around the fire as part of a week-long celebration called ‘wellness week,’ aimed at improving personal health and wellness in their community in northern Québec. (David DyckFehderau)

Indigenous group tackles diabetes with storytelling

Like many Indigenous groups around the world, the James Bay Cree of northern Québec have a disproportionately high rate of diabetes. They’re facing it down with a decidedly Indigenous solution.
Indigenous knowledge has aided and enhanced modern science and technology for centuries, Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, speaks about climate change at the global COP22 conference in Marrakech, Morocco, in November 2016. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

How Indigenous knowledge advances modern science and technology

Traditional Indigenous knowledge and science has aided the development of modern scientific knowledge, and including Indigenous people in science is essential to its future.
Isabel Daniels weeps as she speaks of her murdered cousin, Nicole Daniels, at the opening day of hearings at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Winnipeg in October 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods)

Missing and murdered Indigenous women inquiry: We must listen and act

Canadians should be listening closely to stories coming from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. We need to hear the truth and then help justice move forward.
Wooden stakes representing the 2,224 confirmed overdose deaths in British Columbia - many of them young Indigenous people - over the last three years, are placed on the ground at Oppenheimer Park, in Vancouver on September 29, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Indigenous women suffer greatest risk of injury

Research shows that Indigenous women are at greatest risk of injury within Canada. Income, education and housing inequities play a role. So does systemic racism and post-colonial trauma.
A Reconciliation Pole is raised at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, B.C., in April 2017. The 17-metre red cedar pole tells the story of the time before, during and after the Indian residential school system. Thousands of copper nails representing thousands of Indigenous children who died in Canada’s residential schools were hammered into the pole by survivors, affected families, school children and others. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

If ‘indigenizing’ education feels this good, we aren’t doing it right

Calls to "indigenize" universities must start with listening - to Indigenous scholars and nations. And real reparation will be painful for settlers, for it will be unsettling.
Uluru at sunset at the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in the Northern Territory. AAP

Why we are banning tourists from climbing Uluru

The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Board of management has this week announced that tourists will be banned from climbing Uluru from 2019. Sammy Wilson, chairman of the park board, explains why.
Many homes in remote Indigenous communities rely on wood or diesel for heating. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Clean energy can advance Indigenous reconciliation

More than 200 remote communities in Canada rely on diesel fuel for energy. Cleaner options could fuel a better quality of life.
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
Many women are released from prison with untreated mental and physical health problems, and no access to a doctor. In pain, they seek solace in illicit drugs. Pictured here, women mourn those who have died of drug overdose in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Women need health and dental care to stay out of prison

A staggering 70 per cent of female inmates are back in prison within two years of their release. Basic health and dental care could help change this, according to new research.
Indigenous Australians use ochre to add colour and detail to items such as this shield at the South Australian Museum. Image courtesy of South Australian Museum

When bacteria tell a story: tracing Indigenous Australian ochre sources via microbial ‘fingerprinting’

Ochre is more than just paint - it tells stories of culture and trade in Indigenous Australians. Using museum artefacts plus science can track ochre sources and untangle a lost history.

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