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Articles on Indigenous

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Unhoused people and supporters protest against police as they prepare to clear homeless encampments in Edmonton on Jan. 9, 2024. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Encampment sweeps in Edmonton are yet another example of settler colonialism

Encampment sweeps in Edmonton are a brutal attack on both human and treaty rights, as well as a continuation of the violent removal of Indigenous Peoples from their land.
Newfoundland and Tasmania, Australia, have been described as ‘mirror islands’ with striking linkages. Site of one of the field excursions during the authors’ 12-day exchange to Tasmania, Australia. (Author Provided, Brady Reid)

Flipping Indigenous regional development in Newfoundland upside-down: lessons from Australia

The lessons from Tasmania are clear. Asserting Indigenous rights in Canada can be mutually beneficial for all.
A gathering of Indigenous community members, Knowledge Keepers and Elders, service providers, researchers and non-Indigenous allies met in Toronto to talk about neurodevelopmental disabilities. (Jason Jenkins)

Hearing the voices of Indigenous people with neurodevelopmental disabilities

Although their stories often tell of strengths, struggles and important community contributions, the voices of Indigenous people with neurodevelopmental disabilities often go unheard.
Stuckless Pond in Gros Morne National Park, N.L. Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas can complement national and provincial parks to promote conservation while also advancing reconciliation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

Canada’s Nature Agreement underscores the need for true reconciliation with Indigenous nations

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas face significant hurdles but nevertheless remain a key way to advance reconciliation and environmental goals.
University of Ottawa Chancellor Claudette Commanda, left, helps fold the memorial cloth banner during a Remembering the Children event marking National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on Sept. 30, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Spencer Colby

‘Indigenizing’ universities means building relationships with nations and lands

‘Indigenization’ across departments implies the need for consultation with local Indigenous communities and a shift towards all departments and faculty recognizing we work on Indigenous lands.
Planting trees on deforested lands in Panama. Jorge Aleman/Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Paying people to replant tropical forests − and letting them harvest the timber − can pay off for climate, justice and environment

It might seem counterintuitive to suggest timber harvesting when the goal is to restore forests, but that gives landholders the economic incentive to protect and manage forests over time.
Giovanna Stevens grew up harvesting salmon at her family’s fish camp on Alaska’s Yukon River. Climate change is interrupting hunting and fishing traditions in many areas. AP Photo/Nathan Howard

Arctic Report Card 2023: From wildfires to melting sea ice, the warmest summer on record had cascading impacts across the Arctic

The early heat melted snow and warmed rivers, heating up the land and downstream ocean areas. The effects harmed salmon fisheries, melted sea ice and fueled widespread fires.
The Williams Treaties cover over 20,000 square kilometres of lands between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River, and along the shore of Lake Ontario up to Lake Simcoe. Fred Marsden, member of Alderville First Nation, seen fishing in the Kawartha Lakes area, date unknown. (Jackson Pind)

Revisiting the Williams Treaties of 1923: Anishinaabeg perspectives after a century

Seven Williams Treaties First Nations continue to call on the provincial government to adequately consult them when making important decisions on their lands in the Greenbelt and beyond.
Musician Buffy Sainte-Marie, pictured here in 1970, has long said she didn’t know who her birth parents were but that she was Indigenous. Last week, a CBC investigation revealed both her parents were white. CMA-Creative Management Associates, Los Angeles

How journalists tell Buffy Sainte-Marie’s story matters — explained by a ’60s Scoop survivor

Lori Campbell, a ‘60s Scoop survivor, challenges the CBC’s motives in their exposé on the questionable Indigenous roots of legendary singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie.

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