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Articles on Intergenerational trauma

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A woman examines a diamond she is in the process of cutting and polishing in Yellowknife, N.W.T. in a photo from 2003. (CP PHOTO/Bob Weber)

Diamond mines in the Northwest Territories are not a girl’s best friend

While marketing has made diamond rings a symbol of heteronormative happy endings, women from the Northwest Territories tell a different story about their experiences with the diamond mines.
Bundhurr Marburumburaay Miilgi Ngalgarra (lighting, thunder, rain, shine)- no matter how big, strong or scary the storm the sun will shine again. Artist Renae Lamb, Wiradjuri Wongabong. Owner Midnight Dreaming. Used with permission. Provided by author

10 ways we can better respond to the pandemic in a trauma-informed way

The COVID-19 pandemic is a stressful time for all, and even more so for people experiencing trauma-related stress. How can public health emergency responses avoid further trauma for vulnerable people?
A growing number of accredited justice facility dogs work supporting child victims, like Dorado, a valued member of the IWK Suspected Trauma and Abuse Response Team at the SeaStar Child & Youth Advocacy Centre in Halifax. (Justice Facility Dogs Canada)

Justice facility dogs: The quiet, skilled heroes helping child victims

Highly skilled dogs are hard at work supporting the child victims of crime. Meet the justice facility dogs.
Two young children sit next to shoes left in front of a statue of Egerton Ryerson, who was instrumental in the design and implementation of the Indian Residential School System. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Indigenous lawyer: Investigate discovery of 215 children’s graves in Kamloops as a crime against humanity

An Indigenous lawyer makes the case that what happened to Indigenous children who went to residential schools is genocide and the case should be tried by the International Criminal Court.
Crystal Bulumbara, Esther Bulumbara, Claire Smith and Nell Brown. Barunga community, Northern Territory. July 2019. Narritj

Friday essay: voices from the bush – how lockdown affects remote Indigenous communities differently

Researchers report on how COVID-19 is affecting isolated Indigenous communities. Their voices bridge the urban divide, reveal challenges and describe some unexpected bonuses.
The system of ‘birth alerts’ across Canada perpetuates the removal of children from Indigenous families begun by residential schools. Pictured here: a historical report on residential schools released by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

British Columbia’s ban on ‘birth alerts:’ A guiding light on the road to reconciliation

To make meaningful progress on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, all provinces and territories should promptly follow B.C. and ban discriminatory ‘birth alerts.’
Following the deaths of an alarming number Indigenous young people earlier this year, Australian leaders were urged to declare a ‘national crisis’. Shutterstock

Australia has been silent on Indigenous suicide for too long, and it must change

Policies aimed at reducing youth suicide will fail if they don’t acknowledge the cumulative effects of history, associated intergenerational trauma and ongoing violence towards Indigenous Australians.
Being separated from their children affects the mental well-being of Aboriginal mothers in prison. ChrisMilesProductions/Shutterstock

Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates – and their mental and physical health suffers

Aboriginal mothers in prison feel intergenerational trauma and the forced removal of their children are the most significant factors impacting their health and well-being.
Over the past five years, one in every four children who died by suicide in Australia was Indigenous. Shutterstock

Why are we losing so many Indigenous children to suicide?

Poverty and social exclusion play a big role in Indigenous child suicide. The causes are complex but we know enough to act now to reduce the number of deaths in our communities.
Policies and services designed to protect Aboriginal children’s cultural connections are not being properly implemented. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Australia failing to safeguard cultural connections for Aboriginal children in out-of-home care

New reports show a widespread lack of care for the cultural needs of many of the 19,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection and out-of-home care.
The facilities were poor and some inmates were subjected to unsuccessful experimentation with a “vaccine” that used arsenic compounds. Hospital Ward Dorre Island/State library of Western Australia

What do the newspapers really tell us about the lock hospital histories?

The lock hospitals inflicted incalculable traumas on Aboriginal people, wrenching them away from families and country.

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