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Articles on Kremlin

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Women form a human chain on Feb. 14 in central Moscow to support jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny, his wife Yulia Navalnaya and other political prisoners. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Alexei Navalny leads Russians in a historic battle against arbitrary rule, with words echoing Catherine the Great

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has proved himself to be a master at summoning citizens to protest government abuses. The very words he chooses to use are part of his power.
Protesters oppose riot police during a rally in support of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny on January 31, 2021 in Moscow, Russia. Oleg Nikishin/Getty Images

Navalny returns to Russia and brings anti-Putin politics with him

Poisoning Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny didn't get rid of him. He survived the attack, and now the Kremlin must deal with a reinvigorated reform movement led by Navalny.
Not in Russia: An election observer takes notes as Gwinnett County workers process ballots in Lawrenceville, Georgia, Nov. 6. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Russia’s rigged elections look nothing like the US election – they have immediate, unquestioned results there

Charges by President Donald Trump and his allies that the 2020 election was rigged are challenged by experts in Russian elections, where rigging the outcome is an established way of life.
Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny (L) poses for a photo at a Moscow rally in support of political prisoners on September 29, 2019. Dmitri Chirciu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Alexei Navalny revolutionized opposition politics in Russia, before his apparent poisoning

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, gravely ill from a suspected poisoning, brought a new type of opposition to Russia in tune with popular concerns and aimed at finding common ground.
Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) and now-former Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev (R) in Sochi, Russia, Dec. 7, 2019. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

Russia’s cabinet resigns and it’s all part of Putin’s plan

Russia's cabinet resigned Wednesday, and it looked like an unexpected move. But a Russia scholar says it is part of a plan by leader Vladimir Putin to maintain power after he leaves office.
The U.S. Capitol is seen here in this January 2018 photo. Three top Russian intelligence officials met with their American counterparts in D.C. in January. Why? (AP Photo)

Pondering the mystery of why the Russians came to Washington

In January, three top Russian intelligence officials met with their peers in Washington, D.C. What was their goal amid the Robert Mueller investigation? An expert on Russia speculates.
Russian diplomats and their families boarding a plane for home after being expelled by Britain. Reuters/Chris Radburn

Is the growing Russia crisis another Cold War conflict? Nyet

The crisis over alleged Russian involvement in a murder attempt on a spy and his daughter in the UK has been called an extension of the Cold War. But that war was about ideology; this crisis isn't.
ANC President Cyril Ramaphosa has been the subject of much scrutiny during his rise to the party’s top position. GCIS/GovernmentZA/Flickr

South Africans are trying to decode Ramaphosa (and getting it wrong)

The study of Cyril Ramaphosa, South Africa's deputy president and new head of its governing party, is generating a great deal of heat, and not much light.
A worker cleans a statue of Vladimir Lenin in St. Petersburg. But how much Russian history gets whitewashed today? Dmitri Lovetsky/AP Photo

How does an authoritarian regime celebrate a revolution?

Because the Kremlin hopes to project strength and unity, history isn't used as much to inform as it is to inspire, with events cherry-picked to fit within a fuzzy framework of 'Russian greatness.'

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