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Articles on law and order

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Armed white citizens and police have historically worked together in the U.S., though it’s not clear whether that’s what’s happening here. George Frey/Getty Images

Vigilantism, again in the news, is an American tradition

For many Americans, law and order has long been as much a private matter as something for the government to handle.
South African police minister Bheki Cele (left) claims success in the investigation of political killings in KwaZulu-Natal. With him is the head of the police, Khehla Sithole. GCIS

South Africa fails to get to the bottom of killings in KwaZulu-Natal

The task team established to investigate political killings in KwaZulu-Natal has had little impact on exposing those behind the violence.
New research shows that Canadians who live in rural areas hold more punitive attitudes about crime and how to control it than their urban counterparts. (Pixabay)

Crime and punishment: Rural people are more punitive than city-dwellers

Those living in rural areas have more punitive attitudes toward crime and how to control it than city-dwellers, and it's a major component of the growing urban-rural divide in Canada.
Outgoing Victorian opposition leader Matthew Guy and wife Renae as Guy acknowledges defeat in the recent Victorian state election in which he had tried to appeal to voters’ fears over street crime, race and terrorism. David Crosling/AAP

Law and order is no get-out-of-jail card for floundering politicians

At one time, law and order was seen by some as a sure-fire voter winner in elections - but that's changing after a concerted effort by Victoria's opposition appeared to backfire badly.
A global survey claims South Africans don’t trust their police. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why the global survey on safety is deeply flawed

The Law and Order Index says South Africans feel less secure than people in Yemen, the DRC and Libya, countries all affected by violent conflict.
A harsh criminal justice system – in particular, more prisons and people behind bars – has apparently become a hallmark of good government. AAP/Dave Hunt

How ‘tough on crime’ politics flouts death-in-custody recommendations

Australia has become less compassionate, more punitive and more ready to blame individuals for their alleged failings since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody.
Electronic monitoring typically involves fitting offenders with tamper-proof bracelets to monitor whether they are abiding by conditions imposed on them. Flickr/Chris Yarzab

Electronic innovation can help fix an archaic, crowded prison system

The days of prison, an 18th-century industrial institution, as the justice system's dominant form of punishment may be numbered. Electronic monitoring of offenders is one promising alternative.
A NSW programme in which prisoners train stray dogs as part of their rehabilitation is one of a number of innovations adopted in recent years. AAP

Crime and punishment and rehabilitation: a smarter approach

Approaches to crime that rely on punitive methods have proved to be ineffective and counter-productive. Rehabilitation programmes not only prevent crime, but are cost-effective and practical.
Rising imprisonment rates are the result of political responses to media and public agitation for tougher sentences. AAP/David Crosling

The evidence is in: you can’t link imprisonment to crime rates

Some claim rising crime rates justify jailing more people, others that such policies cut crime. Evidence from around the world shows those claims are wrong and that we should be looking at inequality.
Most of Tasmania’s relatively small prison population is housed at Risdon Prison Complex. Wikimedia Commons/'Risdon' by Wiki ian

State of imprisonment: Tasmania escapes ‘law and order’ infection

Imprisonment rates in Tasmania have steadily declined over the past decade -- the only state or territory where this has happened. That is a result of progressive and effective corrections policies.

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