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Chinese engineers pose after welding the first seamless rails for the China-Laos railway in Vientiane, Laos, June 18, 2020. Kaikeo Saiyasane/Xinhua via Getty Images

China is financing infrastructure projects around the world – many could harm nature and Indigenous communities

Through its Belt and Road Initiative, China has become the world’s largest country-to-country lender. A new study shows that more than half of its loans threaten sensitive lands or Indigenous people.
A grant from the Chinese government will make way for a multimillion-dollar fishing port complex in Accra, Ghana. Nipah Dennis/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 further exposes inequalities in the global financial system

Global economic policy excludes low-income countries from the spending options that developed nations use to buffer their economies in times of crisis, and the pandemic has inflamed that inequality.
South Africa’s finance minister Tito Mboweni says the IMF loan will limit the country’s economic vulnerabilities which have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Gallo Images/Brenton Geach

The IMF’s $4bn loan for South Africa: the pros, cons and potential pitfalls

The IMF loan does not impose any conditions over and above what is in South African law on how the funds can be used; it only seems to expect the country to implement policies already announced.
Taking a loan has never been easier thanks to the proliferation of mobile lending platforms. Rosenfeld Media/Wikimedia Commons

Mobile-based lending is huge in Kenya: but there’s a downside too

Mobile loan platforms have given Kenyans access to easy loans, but they come at a high price.
Researchers found that families who send their children off to college face an increased risk for foreclosure. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Thinking about borrowing against your home to send your kids to college? Think again

The odds of foreclosure double for families who send their kids off to college, according to two researchers who say their findings show a need for new ways for Americans pay for higher education.
The financial system is awash with money, which is why interest rates have been so low for so long. (Shutterstock)

How banks have set a trap for the U.S. Fed by creating money

It’s been 10 years since the U.S. signed into law a scheme to print money, essentially, and save the financial sector amid the sub-prime mortgage meltdown. Did it work? And who’s truly benefitted?

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