Menu Close

Articles on Lula da Silva

Displaying 1 - 20 of 24 articles

Pastor Silas Malafaia, second from left, prays alongside President Jair Bolsonaro, far left, at the Assembly of God Victory in Christ Church in Rio de Janeiro. AP Photo/Bruna Prado

Religion is shaping Brazil’s presidential election – but its evangelicals aren’t the same as America’s

Trump and Bolsonaro use religion in similar ways, but there are key differences between the two countries’ evangelical communities – and politics.
Lula with activists of the Landless Movement, March 21, 2022. Though he is leading the incumbent president Jair Bolsonaro in the polls, Lula’s victory is not assured. (LulaOfficial)

Elections in Brazil: Lula faces many challenges running against Jair Bolsonaro

Former Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, commonly known as Lula, enjoys a comfortable lead over incumbent Jair Bolsonaro. But the Workers’ Party candidate faces many challenges.
A man protesting in New York City one year after the violent insurrection in Washington, D.C. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Prosecuting Trump would inevitably be political – and other countries have had mixed success in holding ex-presidents accountable

Criminal charges against former President Donald Trump for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot could spark political consequences – not only for Trump, but for US democracy.
Adoring fans celebrated Brazilian ex-President Luiz Inacio ‘Lula’ da Silva before he began a prison sentence for corruption in 2018. Lula’s conviction was recently annulled. Miguel Schincariol/AFP via Getty Images)

Prosecuting ex-presidents for corruption is trending worldwide – but it’s not always great for democracy

From Europe to Latin America and the US, former world leaders are being investigated, tried and even jailed. In theory, this shows no one is above the law. But presidents and PMs aren’t just anyone.
Sergio Moro, former judge and now Brazil’s justice minister, was heralded for his Operation Car Wash anti-corruption investigations. Now he’s facing allegations he co-ordinated with prosecutors, improperly advising them in a case against former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Brazil’s Operation Car Wash: A corruption investigator is accused of his own misdeeds

Brazil’s Justice Minister Sergio Moro, once a judge who oversaw a massive and successful anti-corruption operation, is accused of improperly directing prosecutors in a case against a former president.
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro walks past the Granaderos presidential guard during a recent welcoming ceremony in Santiago, Chile. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

The new Brazilian government is devoid of ideas

The popularity of Brazil’s new president has decreased significantly in just a few months. Why? Too much controversy and too few ideas.
Presidential runoff candidates: Jair Bolsonaro, far-right lawmaker of the Social Liberal Party and Fernando Haddad of Brazil’s leftist Workers Party. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes/Washington Alves

‘Disillusioned’ Brazilians choose Bolsonaro, Haddad after a tense and violent campaign

After four years of economic crisis and corruption, Brazilians have never trusted their government less. They showed their frustration Sunday, voting for two ideologically opposed candidates.
With over a dozen candidates and an incarcerated front-runner, Brazil’s 2018 presidential election has political analysts shrugging their shoulders. AP Photo/Leo Correa

Brazilian candidate still crushing his rivals from jail

Leftist former President Lula da Silva is the clear favorite in Brazil’s 2018 presidential race, leading his closest rival — a firebrand conservative — by 15 points. The only problem: He’s in jail.
An appeals court ruling against Lula may disqualify this popular former Brazilian president from running again in October 2018. Supporters vehemently maintain his innocence. Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

Presidential corruption verdict shows just how flawed Brazil’s justice system is

An appeals court ruling against popular Brazilian ex-president Lula has hotly divided Brazil. A legal scholar argues that this is a case of activist judges taking their anti-graft crusade too far.

Top contributors

More