Articles on Lung cancer

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Former President Jimmy Carter pictured at an Atlanta Braves-Toronto Blue Jays game in Atlanta on Sept. 17, 2015, shortly after being treated for melanoma. AP Photo/John Bazemore

Cancer deaths decline in US, with advances in prevention, detection and treatment

Cancer mortality has dropped in the US, due largely to lower smoking rates, as well as early detection and better treatments. These advances often do not extend to people in developing nations.
If we can’t afford natural stone, like marble, it’s tempting to choose engineered or artificial stone instead. But at what cost to those who breathe in the silica dust when cutting it? from www.shutterstock.com

Engineered stone benchtops are killing our tradies. Here’s why a ban’s the only answer

What lessons can Australia learn from tackling asbestos to manage this latest preventable occupational hazard?
Smoking is the biggest cause of preventable death in the U.S. A test for long-time smokers might be able to detect lung cancer earlier, thereby saving lives. Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

The test that could save the life of a long-time smoker you know

Low-dose CT scans can detect lung cancer in smokers and former smokers at an early and sometimes treatable stage. Why are so few smokers and former smokers getting them?
Cigarettes have been known for years to cause many diseases. Tobacco companies now have to pay $9 billion each year to help states pay for the costs of treatment to people they sickened. Protosav-AN/Shutterstock.com

April 15 is the day tobacco companies pay $9 billion for tobacco illnesses, but is it enough?

April 15 is not only a day to pay individual taxes to the IRS. It is also the day that tobacco companies must pay a penalty to help offset states' costs for the treatment of tobacco-related diseases.
Johnson & Johnson was ordered to pay US$.4.69 billion in July, 2018 because it failed to warn customers that its baby powder contains asbestos. Matt Rourke/AP Photo

Why asbestos litigation won’t go away: Because asbestos won’t go away

Asbestos litigation is the number one source of tort claims in the US, with many people decrying the filing of so many claims. But there's a reason the claims persist. Asbestos isn't going anywhere.
This ad featuring then-actor Ronald Reagan is an example of industry advertising that made smoking so popular. University of California San Francisco Tobacco Archives

Smoking rates in US have fallen to all-time low, but how did they ever get so high?

Smoking rates are at their lowest, but it has been a long and expensive struggle. Promoters of cigarette smoking have included not only tobacco companies but advertisers and even the US government.
Anti-smoking ads such as this one can help curb smoking, but studies are suggesting that raising the tax on cigarettes may be most effective to help deter poor people. California Department of Public Health

A vaccine to stop lung cancer? It’s made from tobacco taxes and legislation

Lung Cancer Awareness Month starts today, but observance of it often slips under the radar, in part because there are so few survivors. Here's how the biggest cancer killer could actually be halted.
An Ottawa high school student looks at plain cigarette packaging examples on World No Tobacco Day in May 2016. Tobacco companies are railing against Ottawa’s plans for plain cigarette packaging in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Big Tobacco’s opposition to plain packaging is plain spin

The Canadian government is currently drafting regulations on plain packaging for cigarettes. Tobacco companies are trying to weaken the regulations via lobbying and misleading PR campaigns.
New research shows the risk of lung cancer slowly increases five to 10 years after a breast radiation treatment; a form of brachytherapy developed in Canada is the safest treatment to reduce this risk. (Shutterstock)

The risk of lung cancer for young breast cancer survivors

New research reveals the risks of lung cancer after breast cancer radiotherapy and identifies the best treatment to reduce these risks.
Author Tim Edwards’ dog Tui is part of a team of canines being trained to detect lung cancer in breath and saliva samples. University of Waikato

Dogs’ sensitive noses may be the key to early detection of lung cancer

Researchers are training dogs to detect lung cancer in breath and saliva samples, with the aim of developing early-detection screening and a functional “electronic nose” for diagnosing lung cancer.
A man smokes an electronic cigarette in Chicago in this 2014 photo. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Why the e-cigarette industry needs global regulations

The e-cigarette industry emerged as an alternative to traditional tobacco, but now it's dominated by Big Tobacco. That's why transnational regulations are needed for the industry.
Liquid biopsy is less invasive than standard biopsy, where a needle is put into a solid tumour to confirm a cancer diagnosis. Shutterstock

A new blood test can detect eight different cancers in their early stages

There are currently few effective and non-invasive methods to screen for early stages of cancer. But scientists have now developed a new blood test that promises to detect eight different cancers.
Judge Gladys Kessler’s ruling in 2006 was the basis for tobacco companies’ corrective statements now airing on TV and placed in newspapers. Tobacco Free Kids

Who forced the cigarette companies to run those anti-smoking ads?

The journey to the ads that cigarettes companies started running Nov. 26, 2017 about the dangers of smoking and their bad behavior started 64 years ago .

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