Articles on Marine heatwaves

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Recent marine heatwaves have devastated crucial coastal habitats, including kelp forests, seagrass meadows and coral reefs. Dan Smale

Suffering in the heat: the rise in marine heatwaves is harming ocean species

Marine heatwaves, like their land counterparts, are growing hotter and longer. Sea species in southeastern Australia, southeast Asia, northwestern Africa, Europe and eastern Canada are most at risk.
Shark Bay was hit by a brutal marine heatwave in 2011. W. Bulach/Wikimedia Commons

Shark Bay: A World Heritage Site at catastrophic risk

Everyone knows the Great Barrier Reef is in peril. But a continent away, Western Australia's Shark Bay is also threatened by marine heatwaves that could alter this World Heritage ecosystem forever.
Queensland groper, typical of coral reefs off Queensland at 27°S were found in the Bay of Islands, north of Auckland, at 35°S. from www.shutterstock.com

Farmed fish dying, grape harvest weeks early – just some of the effects of last summer’s heatwave in NZ

Analysis of last summer's heatwave shows it killed farmed salmon and decimated kelp forests, as well as shifting grape harvests and fish spawning times forward by several weeks.
This summer, coastal seas to the north and east of New Zealand are even warmer than during last year’s marine heat wave. from www.shutterstock.com

Coastal seas around New Zealand are heading into a marine heatwave, again

Marine heatwaves may become the new normal for the Tasman Sea and the ocean around New Zealand, and oceanographers are developing models to better predict their intensity.
Staghorn and tabular corals suffered mass die-offs, robbing many individual reefs of their characteristic shapes. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Mia Hoogenboom

How the 2016 bleaching altered the shape of the northern Great Barrier Reef

The 2016 bleaching event resulted in 30% mortality on the Great Barrier Reef, with many corals dying of the heat before they bleached and the loss of branching corals creating less complex reef structure.
The southern Great Barrier Reef escaped both of the recent mass bleaching events. But time is running out. AAP Image/ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Tory Chase

The world’s coral reefs are in trouble, but don’t give up on them yet

Tropical coral reefs can be saved from climate change and other pressures, but the window of opportunity is closing. And reefs are guaranteed to be markedly different in the future.
Tasmania’s bushfires damaged pristine bushland and stretched emergency services to the limit. AAP Image/Patrick Caruana

Was Tasmania’s summer of fires and floods a glimpse of its climate future?

This summer has seen Tasmania suffer through drought, bushfires, floods and the worst marine heatwave on record. Is this what life under a climate-changed future will be like?

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