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Articles on Medical education

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Emergency medical technicians bring a patient into Wyckoff Hospital in the Borough of Brooklyn on April 6, 2020 in New York. Bryna R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images.

Doctors can’t treat COVID-19 effectively without recognizing the social justice aspects of health

While African Americans account for about 14% of the US population, they have accounted for about 60% of deaths from the virus. Several physicians offer an idea they think could help.
Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Exercise is medicine, and doctors are starting to prescribe it

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
Training in improvisational theatre enables health professionals to learn deeper empathy, as well as mental agility and other clinical skills. (Shutterstock)

How theatre training can boost your doctor’s empathy

Health professionals need a dose of drama in their training to build clinical and interpersonal skills.
Grey’s Anatomy’s portrayal of trauma experiences is far more dramatic than in real life. IMDb/Shondaland, The Mark Gordon Company, Touchstone Television (2005-2007), ABC Studios

Grey’s Anatomy is unrealistic, but it might make junior doctors more compassionate

A new study compared fictional patient experiences in Grey's Anatomy with real trauma cases. It concluded patients who are fans of the show might have unrealistic expectations of medical care.
Doctors have to deal with death every day. It’s not easy to come to terms with it. from www.shutterstock.com.au

How doctors are taught to deal with death

Teaching students to care for the dying requires specific skills that the student may not encounter in their ordinary clinical teaching.
A new model of ‘competency based’ medical education is gaining popularity globally, in which trainees are assessed on skill rather than mere time invested. (Shutterstock)

How to improve the skills of tomorrow’s doctors

A radical new model of "competency based" medical education emphasizes trainee skill over time invested. Queen's University is the first in Canada to fully embrace this shift.
Commemorations to honour those who have donated their bodies for the study of anatomy not only contain symbolic objects like candles and flowers, but also song and online tributes. from www.shutterstock.com

Medical schools are shaking off a dark past by honouring people who donate their bodies to science

We've come a long way since the dark days of grave robbing to provide bodies for dissection. Now, there are ceremonies and memorials to honour people who have donated their body to science.
The latest evidence-based treatments for opioid addiction are often under-used, due to inadequate addiction education for doctors and nurses. (Shutterstock)

Better medical education: One solution to the opioid crisis

Most physicians are unaware of effective approaches to treat opioid addiction. Addiction medicine fellowships offer a new and effective way to save lives.
Private medical schools in the Caribbean promise low fees and tropical beach locations, amongst other benefits. (Valorie Crooks)

The risky lure of Caribbean offshore medical schools

Competition for spaces is driving Canadian undergraduates to medical school in the tropics. And there are risks - for student career prospects and Caribbean health systems.
For some medical students, learning on simulated patients isn’t enough. from www.shutterstock.com

Is it OK for medical students to practise on themselves?

Medical students are practising invasive techniques on themselves and fellow students, a new study shows. But aside from obvious safety concerns, is there anything wrong with self-practice?

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