Articles on Medicare

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When you’re admitted to a public hospital, they’ll want to know if you have private health insurance. From shutterstock.com

If you’ve got private health insurance, the choice to use it in a public hospital is your own

When you enter a public hospital, you are likely to be asked if you have private health insurance, and if you want to use it. This is what you need to consider.
For some people, high out-of-pocket costs makes it difficult to see a doctor or fill a prescription. From shutterstock.com

We need more than a website to stop Australians paying exorbitant out-of-pocket health costs

Seeking and making sense of specialist fees is an unfair burden to place on vulnerable patients. A website might be helpful for some – but health professionals need to be held to higher account.
The number of Medicare claims Australians make in a year doubled between 1984 and 2018. By Sopotnick

More visits to the doctor doesn’t mean better care – it’s time for a Medicare shake-up

Paying doctors a fee for each service they provide isn't delivering optimal value for the health dollar. Instead, we should pay doctors a lump sum to care for a patient's medical problem over time.
Treating somebody at risk of developing a mental health disorder may improve their outcomes later on. Jeremy Perkins/Unsplash

For people at risk of mental illness, having access to treatment early can help

Early intervention is a proven way to address the burden of mental ill health. We just need to better understand who is at risk of developing a mental disorder – and how best to treat them.
Falls are the No. 1 cause of accidental death in people 65 and older and a major cause of disability. Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

Before the fall: How oldsters can avoid one of old age’s most dangerous events

Falls are a major cause of disability in seniors - but there are some clearcut ways to prevent them.
People ages 50-64 begin to develop chronic conditions for which they need coverage. Doing away with insurance for pre-existing conditions puts this group at risk. Syda Productions/Shutterstock.com

Pre-existing conditions: The age group most vulnerable if coverage goes away

Stripping away preexisting conditions coverage would have far-reaching effects, but 50- to 64-year-olds are most vulnerable. Ignoring medical issues at that age could mean sicker oldsters later on.
Nearly every Canadian family has a wait time story. This is because our system is not designed to provide optimal care for patients with multiple chronic diseases. (Shutterstock)

How to solve Canada’s wait time problem

To improve wait times for surgery, Canada needs to fix its health-care system. Developing a national seniors' strategy would be a good place to start.
Australians are spending a larger proportion of their income on health insurance as premium increases outpace wage growth. The Conversation / Shutterstock

Private health insurance premium increases explained in 14 charts

Private health insurance premiums are set to rise again. These 14 charts (well, technically 10 charts and four tables) look at some of the reasons why health insurance premiums keep going up and up.
Most caregivers today are assisting their relatives. What will happen in the years ahead? ChaiyonS021/Shutterstock.com

Why the daunting economics of elder care are about to get much worse

The demographics, which include declining numbers of adult children free to step up and potentially fewer immigrants, suggest that this big problem society faces will get bigger.
Doctors’ visits can be overwhelming for older people. Syda Productions/Shutterstock.com

5 questions to ask your aging parents’ doctors

More than 47 million people age 65 and older live in the US, and many need help accessing health care. Here are some questions that grown children should ask their parents' doctors.
More knowledge about your genetic makeup enables you to make better-informed choices – but at what cost? Shutterstock

Not all genetic tests should be publicly funded – here’s why

It's exciting to think we're on the brink of a genomic revolution in health care. But just because new technology becomes available, it doesn't mean it should automatically be publicly funded.
Some of the original advocates for Medicare in the 1960s hoped to eventually extend it to everyone. AP Photo

‘Medicare for all’ could be cheaper than you think

Bernie Sanders' single-payer health care plan is bound to be expensive and politically impossible. A simple expansion of Medicare offers a cheaper and more passable path to universal care.

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