Articles on Mexico

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A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
Central American migrants face extortion, robbery, assault, kidnapping, rape and murder on their weeks-long journey through Mexico. Some find safety in numbers. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants travel in groups for a simple reason: safety

More than two-thirds of Central American migrants will experience violence on their journey through Mexico, from robbery and extortion to rape. Caravans create safety in numbers.
Mexican soldiers killed up to 300 student protesters and arrested 1,000 more on Oct. 3, 1968, in an event that’s come to be known as the Tlatelolco massacre. AP Photo

Massacres, disappearances and 1968: Mexicans remember the victims of a ‘perfect dictatorship’

Fifty years ago, soldiers gunned down hundreds of student protesters in a Mexico City plaza. It was neither the first nor the last time Mexico's army would be deployed against its own citizens.
Migrants in Sangatte, 2008. No border Network/Flickr

Migrants: deaths in the name of law

Little thought has been accorded to the way in which political and bureaucratic actors prioritise certain lives over others in their (non) decision-making.
Cable cars grace many urban skylines, including this one in Portland, in the United States. Patrick M/Flickr

Look up Australia, cable cars could ease our traffic woes

Popular as gondolas in ski-fields around the world, cable cars, aerial trams, wires or ropeways are increasingly used for mass transit in progressive cities. Is this the future for Australian cities?
New suicide data indicates that years of record bloodshed in Mexico have traumatized residents in places where the violence is most concentrated. Reuters/Jorge Lopez

Rising suicides in Mexico expose the mental health toll of living with extreme, chronic violence

Ciudad Juárez, on the US-Mexico border, has suffered high levels of deadly violence for over a decade. New suicide data reveals the severe mental health impacts of living with chronic violence.
Luvia Hernandez Gomez, right, receives a monthly stipend from the Mexican government to help take care of her niece, center, and daughter, left. N. Haenn

Mexican anti-poverty program targeting poor women may help men most, study finds

Mexico gives poor, jobless moms up to $147 a month to feed and educate their kids. But money with strings attached may actually overburden women while freeing up their husbands' time and money.
An agave plant cutter, or ‘jimador,’ cuts the tips off from agave branches at a Jose Cuervo blue agave field. AP Photo/Guillermo Arias

3 questions about tequila, answered

Is a shot of tequila actually good for you? And what's the deal with the worm? To celebrate National Tequila Day, a food historian explores some little-known aspects of the popular Mexican spirit.
Javier Garrido Martinez holds his four-year-old son during a news conference in New York on July 11, 2018. The pair were reunited after being separated for almost two months when authorities stopped them at the U.S. southern border. (AP Photo/Robert Bumsted)

The disgrace of detaining asylum seekers and other migrants

The U.S. immigration detention system under Donald Trump is abusive, racist, sexist and haphazardly implemented, all designed to terrorize people attempting to exercise their right to seek asylum.

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