Articles on Microgravity

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Experiments performed in microgravity – like this one in the International Space Station by astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti – can give us data not able to be gathered on Earth. NASA

To carve out a niche in space industries, Australia should focus on microgravity research rockets

On Earth the flame from a struck match looks like an inverted teardrop shape and is orange. In microgravity, that same flame is spherical and blue. Heat transfer is different with minimal gravity.
Anne McClain of NASA runs through procedures in the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft during a vehicle fit check Nov. 20. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

Female astronauts: How performance products like space suits and bras are designed to pave the way for women’s accomplishments

Designing for women goes beyond just making gear in a size small. By not tailoring equipment and uniforms for women and other underserved people, we prevent them from reaching their full potential.
Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield on the International Space Station in 2012. NASA

What happens to the brain in zero gravity?

New research has uncovered exactly what happens to the brain when astronauts are in space.
Astronaut Cady Coleman harvests one of our plants on Space Shuttle Columbia. NASA

Taking plants off planet – how do they grow in zero gravity?

Plants on the International Space Station must figure out how to grow in a completely novel environment. Their adaptability hints at how they'll react to changes here on Earth – or in future space outposts.

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