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Articles on MMIWG

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Chief commissioner Marion Buller and commissioners Brian Eyolfson, Qajaq Robinson and Michele Audette prepare the final report to give to the government at the closing ceremony for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Two years after the MMIWG report, targeted work must move urgently ahead

The MMIWG Inquiry two years later: What’s changed and what still needs to be done?
Two young children sit next to shoes left in front of a statue of Egerton Ryerson, who was instrumental in the design and implementation of the Indian Residential School System. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Indigenous lawyer: Investigate discovery of 215 children’s graves in Kamloops as a crime against humanity

An Indigenous lawyer makes the case that what happened to Indigenous children who went to residential schools is genocide and the case should be tried by the International Criminal Court.
Activists, influencers raise alarm after MMIWG content disappears from Instagram on Red Dress Day. (Solen Feyissa/Unsplash)

Beyond a technical bug: Biased algorithms and moderation are censoring activists on social media

Automated content moderation using algorithms are quick and cheaper. But, they’re not necessarily better than human beings. They are prone to errors and can impose bias in a systemic scale.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland the thumbs up after she delivered the federal budget in the House of Commons. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Federal budget 2021: $18 billion is a step towards closing gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities

Budget 2021 includes significant investment in Indigenous communities. Moving forward, post-pandemic recovery and future budgets need to address systemic inequalities.
A teepee outside the women’s unit of the Saskatchewan Penitentiary in Prince Albert, Sask., Jan., 2001. CP PHOTO/Thomas Porter

Indigenous women, transgender and Two-Spirit people need support when leaving prison

To release anyone, particularly Indigenous women, transgender and Two-Spirit individuals without a plan is irresponsible and dangerous and does not demonstrate a commitment to reconciliation.
In 2015, Canadians across the country organized in support of Syrian refugees arriving in the country; these rallies were planned online. (Mike Gifford/flickr)

Leading an online social movement requires offline work

Online social movements are not leaderless. On the contrary, leadership duties are often assumed by identifiable individuals committed to doing leadership work.
The system of ‘birth alerts’ across Canada perpetuates the removal of children from Indigenous families begun by residential schools. Pictured here: a historical report on residential schools released by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

British Columbia’s ban on ‘birth alerts:’ A guiding light on the road to reconciliation

To make meaningful progress on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, all provinces and territories should promptly follow B.C. and ban discriminatory ‘birth alerts.’
A teenage boy throws rocks in the northern Ontario First Nations reserve in Attawapiskat in April 2016. Poverty has a profound impact on First Nations, and Canada needs to take bold wealth- and income-creation measures for the Indigenous. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Charting an economic path forward for First Nations

The MMIWG report didn’t address the poverty that has had such a devastating effect on First Nations. Encouraging active participation by the Indigenous in the Canadian economy is a win-win for everyone.
It is entirely unprecedented to have a sitting head of government admitting to ongoing genocide. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during ceremonies at the release of the MMIWG report in Gatineau, on June 3. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Genocide is foundational to Canada: What are we going to do about it?

Political scientists concern themselves with ideas of democracy. Now that Canada’s PM has accepted the finding of genocide, this changes how and what political scientists need to discuss.
Starvation, kidnapping and neglect policies add up to ongoing genocide. An eagle feather is held up during the release of the MMIWG report in Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Colonial genocide is a composite act: A human rights analysis

The final MMIWG report says that genocide does not refer only to the deliberate murder of some or all members of a particular social group. It also refers to the destruction of a group as a social unit.
Lorelei Williams, right, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wipes away tears while seated with Rhiannon Bennett, left, following the release of the report on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The MMIWG report: A call for decolonizing international law itself

The attempt to grapple with genocide by the MMIWG commission is about more than simply applying international law to the facts. It’s also about decolonizing the international law of genocide itself.
Lorelei Williams, whose cousin was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and whose aunt went missing in 1978, sheds tears while responding to the report on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada’s MMIWG report spurs debate on the shifting definitions of genocide

Understanding genocide as a process can help people grapple with the ongoing threat faced by Indigenous people in Canada, as named in the report into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
Commissioner Michèle Audette speaks during ceremonies marking the release of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls report in Gatineau, Que., on June 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls: An epidemic on both sides of the Medicine Line

The United States could learn from Canada’s national attention being put on the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

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