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Articles on Mobility

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New research suggests many Canadians cannot afford to forgo public transit during the COVID-19 pandemic — or ever. Jed Dela Cruz/Unsplash

Giving up public transit during the coronavirus is a luxury many Canadians can’t afford

Many of Canada's residents, including essential workers, have no choice but to ride transit. Service cuts may cripple their access to essential destinations if governments do not intervene.
Traders wait in line at the Agricultural Produce Market Committee (APMC) market, in Navi Mumbai on April 20, 2020. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE / AFP

Mapping the lockdown effects in India: how geographers can contribute to tackle Covid-19 diffusion

Preliminary results of new research show how using data from social networks such as Facebook may help us understand how the coronavirus spread on local and regional levels.
Rue des Tournelles, Paris, November 5, 2019. Four Voi scooters wait hopefully for potential clients, with a Lime and Dott sprawling nearby. Behind them, a Velib’ rider has made his choice. Leighton Kille/The Conversation France

E-scooters, bikes and urban mobility: lessons from the streets of Paris

In major cities around the world, dockless scooters and bikes are everywhere, yet the companies themselves are often breathtakingly short-lived. Basic economic concepts give us clues why.
Lime is working on ways to overcome the problem of ‘helmet churn’ on its e-scooters. Marvin Fox Photography

Helmet churn adds to challenges of e-scooter disruption

Every day, e-scooters and helmets are put out together, but some people ride without helmets and at the end of each day helmets are missing. So what can be done to ensure safe riding behaviour?
The exploding popularity of e-scooters could reshape mobility in our cities. Regulators need to adapt their approaches to handle the innovation rather than ban it altogether. Ivan Marc/Shutterstock

Banning ‘tiny vehicles’ would deny us smarter ways to get around our cities

The exploding popularity of e-scooters has the potential to reshape transport in our cities. Regulators need to adapt their approaches to handle the new mobility service rather than ban it altogether.
A race to dominate the emerging tech-driven mobility sector is happening in cities around the world. Jakub Kaminski/EPA

The battle to be the Amazon (or Netflix) of transport

Investment is pouring into urban technology, much of it into innovative ventures that aim to transform how we get around our cities.
The Whim app seamlessly connects users to multiple transport modes in Helsinki – public transport, taxis, car rental and car/bicycle sharing. Aleksandra Suzi/Shutterstock

For Mobility as a Service (MaaS) to solve our transport woes, some things need to change

Apps that seamlessly combine all our travel options could be the most significant transport innovation since the automobile, but early trials show government policy support is vital to make MaaS work.
Most transport resources are being used inefficiently. The Canberra Transport Photo shows the road space required to move 69 people using public transport, bicycles and private motor vehicles. Cycling Promotion Fund

Smart mobility alone is no substitute for strong policy leadership

Blind belief that new technology and disruptive innovation will fix congestion in our cities overlooks the need for strong leadership that supports progressive policy innovation.

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