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Articles on native animals

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Australia’s plants and animals have long been used without Indigenous consent. Now Queensland has taken a stand

Our medicine, cosmetics and other everyday products contain compounds taken from nature. But Traditional Owners may not have given permission for the materials or their knowledge to be used.
Worker bees with capped brood (brown), open brood (white larva), all sorts of coloured pollen and shiny fresh nectar. Cooper Schouten

Curious Kids: how do bees make honey?

A single colony of bees can have 60,000 bees in it. Together, they can visit up to 50 million flowers each day to collect pollen and nectar. They're not called 'busy bees' for nothing!
An example of a typical dingo. Photograph depicts a male from K’gari-Fraser Island (Queensland). John Williams

The dingo is a true-blue, native Australian species

Of all Australia’s wildlife, one stands out as having an identity crisis: the dingo. New research has found the dingo is its own species, distinct from 'wild dogs'.
Colonial graziers found it more effective to poison dingoes than rely on convict shepherds to protect their flocks. Justine Philip/AMMRIC 2017

How Australia made poisoning animals normal

As soon as white colonists began farming sheep in Australia, they looked for a way to eradicate dingoes.
The Flock Bronzewing is an inland species that is vulnerable to drought. Those vulnerabilities are heightened in an era of climate change and increased risks from feral predators. Shutterstock

We must strengthen, not weaken, environmental protections during drought – or face irreversible loss

Australian wildlife can generally cope with drought, but they're not prepared for the combination of people, introduced animals, and no water.
Who gets to survive when fire ravages the food and cover of native animals? Flickr/Alastair Smith

Predators get the advantage when bushfires destroy vegetation

Bushfires are a part of life in Australia, and when they have run their course we pick up where we left off and carry on. But if you happen to be a small animal, surviving the bushfire is only the start…

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