Articles on New Deal

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Jeff Jorgenson looks over a partially flooded field he farms near Shenandoah, Iowa, May 29, 2019. AP Photo/Nati Harnik

US agriculture needs a 21st-century New Deal

Three scholars argue that agriculture is failing to sustain either the land or American farmers. They propose a modern version of the New Deal that centers on ecology and economic fairness.
Sophonisba Breckinridge and Edith Abbott. University of Chicago Photographic Archive, apf1-00008, Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago Library/Bernard Hoffman, photographer

Same-sex couples have been in American politics way longer than the Buttigiegs have been married

Long before Chasten Buttigieg became a 'not-so-secret weapon' in his husband Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign, another same-sex couple profoundly reshaped American social policy.
A recent poll suggests many Canadians support the idea of a Green new Deal. Allan Lissner/flickr

The Green New Deal is going global

The idea of the Green New Deal has been around for more than a decade. Why all the fuss about it now?
Sen. Chuck Schumer of N.Y., accompanied by Democratic members of the House and Senate in late 2017. AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Democratic Party’s pluralism is both a strength and weakness

The Democratic Party is a mishmash of causes and interest groups. The party's future will be determined by how its leaders balance and align the interests of its diverse factions.
Old West, as seen through 1967 Orange County eyes. Orange County Archives

Old West theme parks paint a false picture of pioneer California

Knott's Berry Farm and others romanticize the state's past and influence visitors’ sense of history. But their ideology reflects mid-20th-century political conservatism more than settlers' reality.
A Halloween gathering in Los Angeles for children who live on the street, in shelters or in cars. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

How racism has shaped welfare policy in America since 1935

On the 20th anniversary of Bill Clinton's promise to "end welfare as we know it," a social work scholar asks why child poverty is still such a problem in the U.S. and what race has to do with it.
The surprise Republican candidate in 1940: Wendell Willkie. Library of Congress

The last time an outsider like Trump crashed the GOP? 1940

He was a former Democrat, a business tycoon and a media star. The story of Wendell Willkie, the Republicans' surprise candidate in the 1940 election and how he disrupted the GOP.
The battle over regulation of capital markets seemed over by 1937: but by the global financial crisis in 2008, separation of the corporation and the capital market was no longer assured.

Reinventing the rationale for market intervention

Welcome to part two of Back to the Future. Through the Securities and Exchange Commission, James M. Landis helped legitimise the authority of the state to intervene in capital markets, despite a judiciary…

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