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Articles on New mothers

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The gift of sleep, time, self-care (“me time”) and a message of what a remarkable job she is doing may be what new mothers need most this Mother’s Day. (Shutterstock)

Helping new moms return to exercise and leisure supports their physical and mental health

Mothers with young children are consistently identified as having lower levels of physical activity and leisure opportunities, which place their physical and mental health at risk.
There are many ways that families, health-care providers and communities can support the sleep of mothers of babies six months and older. (Shutterstock)

Give the gift of sleep to moms with babies this Mother’s Day

Supporting mothers’ and infants’ sleep can decrease the stressors of motherhood, improve maternal mood and mental health and promote better infant development.
Many women feel there is inadequate support for exercise after the birth of a child, stating a need for more information from health-care professionals about guidelines for returning to physical activity. (Shutterstock)

Returning to exercise postpartum: Supporting women’s physical activity after the birth of a child

When asked about postpartum exercise, women were curious about strategies and recommendations for physical activity after the birth of a child, including finding the time, energy and motivation.
Isolation and other pandemic stresses can harm pregnant women’s mental health, with effects on their babies too. Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Pregnancy during COVID-19 lockdown: How the pandemic has affected new mothers

Pregnant women’s experiences can affect their babies’ health, even into adulthood. Researchers know societywide stresses can lead to these long-term consequences – and the pandemic likely fits the bill.
Preventing early skin to skin contact potentially disrupts newborn physiology. John Ryan/Flickr

Separating mothers with COVID-19 from their newborns does more harm than good

The WHO recommends women should be encouraged to breastfeed straight after birth, for both the mothers’s and baby’s health, including increasing baby’s immunity.
Protected time for new families could pay health dividends later. Jacob Lund/Shutterstock

Paid family leave is an investment in public health, not a handout

The transition to parenthood comes with plenty of stress. A psychology researcher suggests that paid family leave could help lift some of the burden – with positive health benefits down the road.

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