Menu Close

Articles on NFL

Displaying 1 - 20 of 83 articles

Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Chiefs in the NFL Super Bowl 55 football game in February, 2021. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

What if Tom Brady took a knee instead of Colin Kaepernick?

Brady taking a knee is counter to both the man and the league. Nonetheless, had he done so, he would have been received much more favourably.
Jon Gruden is out as coach of the Las Vegas Raiders after emails he sent before being hired in 2018 contained racist, homophobic and misogynistic comments. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)

‘I don’t have an ounce of racism in me’: Jon Gruden and the NFL’s whiteness problem

Jon Gruden’s resignation signals a much needed shift that hopefully forces franchises to be introspective when shaping their team’s social climate.
University of Oregon running back Travis Dye celebrates his touchdown against Fresno State in a stadium smokey from nearby wildfires. (AP Photo/Andy Nelson)

As U.S. football season kicks off, climate change threatens the game

It might be time to reschedule football season. With rising temperatures, poorer air quality and a worsening hurricane season, climate change threatens the future of the American sport.
Los Angeles Rams quarterback Jared Goff throws a pass against the Seattle Seahawks during the first half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game in Seattle in January. The Rams will have to count Goff’s signing bonus towards their salary cap for the next four years, despite trading him to Detroit. (AP Photo/Scott Eklund)

NFL and NHL salary caps have worked out well for players

NFL salary caps were originally introduced to make the league more competitive and reduce performance differences between small and large market teams. But they have also worked out well for players.
‘I’m here so I don’t get fined,’ Seattle Seahawks’ star running back Marshawn Lynch repeatedly told a Jan. 27, 2015, press conference on media day for NFL Super Bowl XLIX. And then he left. AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

Sports writers could ditch the ‘clown questions’ and do better when it comes to press conferences

Athletes no longer need the press to communicate with fans. They can do that directly through social channels – and unless sports reporters do a better job asking questions, they may become obsolete.
Sacramento Kings players kneel in support of the Black Lives Matter movement before an NBA basketball game, August 6, 2020. GettyImages

Athlete activism or corporate woke washing? Getting it right in the age of Black Lives Matter is a tough game

Brands taking a stand on social issues is no longer remarkable — but that only makes it harder to be authentic.
Seattle Seahawks quarterback Rick Mirer (3) is sacked for a seven-yard-loss by Kevin Henry (76) of the Pittsburgh Steelers during the second quarter of their NFL game on Dec. 26, 1993. (AP Photos/Gary Stewart)

NFL concussion lawsuit payouts reveal how racial bias in science continues

In the NFL, anti-Black racism shows up in the disparities between concussion settlements to injured athletes. The amounts of the payouts are determined using assessments that rely on racist science.
It has always been folly to believe that sports were separate from power and politics. AP Photo/Terrance Williams

The numbers behind America’s 180 on athlete activism

For decades, athletes, as a general rule, steered clear of politics. Teams and sponsors liked it that way, and fans did, too. No more.
Some sports teams in the United States and Canada have finally abandoned the use of racist team names and logos. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

Applying corporate pressure to change racist team names isn’t enough

Putting pressure on corporate sponsors is a tactic that has worked when it comes to changing racist team names. But it’s not enough to address systemic racism.
The NFL has been thrust into conversations around criminal justice since Colin Kaepernick and others chose to kneel in protest against police violence, but also in the case of former player Aaron Hernandez. AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

How portrayals of the NFL are shaping criminal justice reform

From Super Bowl ads to Netflix documentaries, the complicated issues of criminal justice are portrayed in simplistic and highly political ways.
Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes celebrates after his team won the NFL divisional playoff football game against the Houston Texans on Jan. 12, 2020. AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

How sports fans respond to their teams’ wavering odds of winning

Watching the chances of victory change injects life into sports, both real and fantasy.
Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett (95) hits Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph (2) with a helmet during a National Football League game Nov. 14, 2019. (AP Photo/David Richard)

Myles Garrett, Don Cherry and the changing nature of the sports boys club

Attempts to disrupt or challenge normative, sporty masculinity has been met by outrage by those who cannot see nor hear the tribalism and male privilege of masculinized spaces like locker rooms.

Top contributors

More