Menu Close

Articles on Non-human primates

Displaying all articles

Rhesus macaques experience an aging process similar to people’s. Goddard Photography/E+ via Getty Images

Expanding Alzheimer’s research with primates could overcome the problem with treatments that show promise in mice but don’t help humans

Nonhuman primates like rhesus monkeys share certain characteristics with people that may make them better study subjects than mice for research on neurodegenerative diseases.
We propose same-sex attraction evolved to allow greater social integration and stronger same-sex social bonds. SHUTTERSTOCK

Homosexuality may have evolved for social, not sexual reasons

Scientists don’t ask how some people evolved to be tall. In the same way, asking how homosexuality evolved is the wrong question. We need to ask how human sexuality evolved in all its forms.
Can’t sleep: these cloned macaque monkeys are missing a gene involved in regulating the sleep/wake cycle. Chinese Academy of Sciences via AAP

Cloning monkeys for research puts humans on a slippery ethical slope

Researchers in China have produce a world first: gene edited, cloned macaque monkeys. They say such animals will be vital for research on human health – but ethical concerns remain.
The grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus): at 60 grams, nearly the smallest primate in the world. I studied this primate in Madagascar. Jason Gilchrist, www.jasongilchrist.co.uk

Dawn of ‘Trumpocene’ era spells disaster for world’s primates

As Donald Trump prepares to enter the White House, there may be dark days ahead for some of the world’s rarest and most beautiful primates.
The NHMRC code on animal use requires researchers to minimise harm, pain and distress but doesn’t provide guidance on how to do it. International Fund for Animal Welfare Animal Rescue Blog/Flickr

Australia failing to protect non-human primates in research

Draft guildelines for the use of non-human primates in research will dilute what protections these animals have, despite numerous reasons to stop the practice entirely.
Perhaps macaques would like Angry Birds too? Jerome Micheletta, University of Portsmouth

Touch screens help monkeys relax

Zoos are great places to study animals. The non-human primates among them get the most attention from researchers. Some of them are trained to interact with computers for psychological research. In a new…

Top contributors

More