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Articles on Nova Scotia

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An allegorical painting depicted the British Empire taking in American loyalists in 1783. Benjamin West’s portrait of John Eardley Wilmot, 1812. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

Refugees after the American Revolution needed money, homes and acceptance

When people fled the new United States in the 18th century, they were taken in by the British Empire but became disillusioned by unfulfilled British promises.
Environmentally dangerous dumps, landfills and pulp and paper mills are more likely to be sited in African Nova Scotian and Mi'kmaw communities. These communities suffer from high rates of cancer and respiratory illness. (Shutterstock)

Environmental racism: New study investigates whether Nova Scotia dump boosted cancer rates in nearby Black community

Black residents of Shelburne, N.S., spent decades living near a dump, worrying about its possible connection to elevated cancer rates. A new study will investigate the dump’s long-term consequences.
The health and well-being of temporary foreign workers in the seafood industry in Atlantic Canada are disregarded in favour of business and economic concerns. (Paul Einerhand/Unsplash)

Profits trump COVID-19 protections for migrant seafood workers in Atlantic Canada

Debates about public safety and temporary foreign workers continue without input from those whose health is most affected. Migrant workers themselves are largely invisible amid discussions about risk.
A woman places a pinwheel in front of a mural dedicated to slain RCMP Const. Heidi Stevenson, a victim of a shooting rampage carried out by a man with unlicensed weapons, in Cole Harbour, N.S., on April 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tim Krochak

Nova Scotia mass shooting shows how deadly unlicensed gun owners can be

Far from just committing 'paper crimes,' the mass shooting in Nova Scotia shows the deadly threats posed by unlicensed gun owners.
A piper plays ‘Amazing Grace’ as local residents look on during a local vigil in Wentworth, N.S., after the worst mass shooting in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Hennessey

Maritime music traditions seek to comfort after Nova Scotia shootings

Virtual music vigils after the Nova Scotia shootings draw on a long tradition of Atlantic Canadian disaster songs and ‘broadside ballads’ to mourn in a time of social distancing.
A man and his son pay respects at a memorial to a teacher in Debert, N.S. on April 21, 2020. RCMP say at least 23 people are dead after a man went on a murder rampage in Nova Scotia communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Let’s call the Nova Scotia mass shooting what it is: White male terrorism

Until we acknowledge that toxic white masculinity is fuelling mass murders, aggrieved white men will continue to commit them – and we’ll all continue to pay the price.
African Canadian communities in Nova Scotia use community green spaces like parks, parking lots and other open spaces to gather, celebrate and strengthen community ties. (Shutterstock)

Why Nova Scotia has to take environmental racism seriously

Nova Scotia’s African Canadian communities have grappled with racism for decades. By looking at community green spaces, we can see how they serve the community’s unique needs.
A Nova Scotia woman displays the tattoo that marks her two liver transplants at the provincial legislature in Halifax in April 2019. The province’s Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act will allow Nova Scotians to donate their organs and tissue unless they opt out. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

A little nudge goes a long way in increasing organ donor registrations

Most Canadians support organ donation after death, but fewer than 25 per cent have registered to donate their organs. What can be done to encourage more registrations?
Feb. 26 is World Spay Day, and spaying or neutering pets has many benefits. Shutterstock

World Spay Day highlights the importance of fixing our pets

Neutering or spaying pets has additional benefits beyond population control; these benefits include extending their lifespan, improving their health and reducing risk of certain diseases.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks at an anti-carbon-tax rally in Calgary, in October 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh)

Let’s create climate policy that will survive elections

In order to address a warming planet over the medium and long-term, climate policy must be designed to be adaptable and indeed attractive to those across the political spectrum.

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