Nuclear weapons

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Blowing up the desert – and people’s minds: the first atom bomb test in 1945. US Government

Radiation in the postwar American mind: from wonder to worry

The first atom bomb test seventy years ago today marks the start of a change in Americans' thinking about radiation. On balance, our nuclear anxieties endure today.
Increased oil and gas revenues amid lifted sanctions are set to raise Iran’s economic fortunes, which ease Middle Eastern tensions. EPA/Abedin Taherkenareh/AAP Image

Energy and economic diplomacy can trump the nuclear ‘threat’ of the Iran deal

Opponents of the Iran nuclear deal say it raises the nuclear weapons threat in the region. But Middle East tensions are actually likely to ease as Iran grows richer without being shackled by sanctions.
The Fukushima disaster was a dark chapter for nuclear power - but high-profile accidents are far from the only downside. EPA/KIMIMASA MAYAMA/AAP

Accidents, waste and weapons: nuclear power isn’t worth the risks

Is nuclear power worth it? No, says Mark Diesendorf – it's never been a major world energy force, it has caused huge accidents, and its greenhouse emissions are higher than many people realise.
A submarine missile-launching capacity brings the threat closer to the shores of the target country. Flickr/Marion Doss

North Korea’s submarine missile firing raises the nuclear stakes

North Korea does not yet have the capacity to launch a nuclear missile from a submarine. Its recent test, however, suggests it is making progress to a game-changing second-strike capability.
A nuclear-capable Pakistani missile during testing in 2011. The international community hopes other aspiring nuclear nations can develop nuclear power without the military muscle. EPA/INTER SERVICES/AAP

Power and peace: how nations can go nuclear without weapons

Through history, nuclear power has gone hand in hand with the nuclear arms race. But does it have to be this way? Closer international cooperation can help nations embrace nuclear power peacefully.
Foreign ministers Julie Bishop and Mohammad Zarif demonstrated a growing rapport between Australia and Iran in reaching agreement on some but not all fronts during her visit to Tehran. EPA

Ms Bishop goes to Tehran: a story of good news and bad news

Australia made progress on restoring trade and sharing intelligence on Islamic State in Iraq. Iran was less open to accepting the return of asylum seekers, which may prove a blessing in disguise.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) holds a meeting with Iran’s Foreign Minister Javad Zarif ® over Iran’s nuclear program in Lausanne on March 17, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Republican fear and loathing of Iran has international consequences

The US is just one actor in an important global non-proliferation regime that works towards preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.
The Trident-class nuclear submarine Vanguard. The Scottish National Party want the weapons system to be scrapped. PA/PA Wire

Fact Check: will renewing Trident cost £100 billion?

Nicola Sturgeon has set out her Scottish National Party's opposition to renewing Britain's nuclear deterrent. Will it cost that much?

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