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Articles on Nudge theory

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The maker of Bud Light says it will give all Americans over 21 a free beer if the U.S. reaches Biden’s 70% vaccination goal. Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Free beer, doughnuts and a $1 million lottery – how vaccine incentives and other behavioral tools are helping the US reach herd immunity

Governments and companies are using incentives in hopes of getting more Americans to get a COVID-19 shot. A behavioral economist explains how they work.
The decoy effect is the phenomenon where consumers swap their preference between two options when presented with a third option. Shutterstock

The decoy effect: how you are influenced to choose without really knowing it

Most pricing structures nudge us to spend more. But there’s a particularly cunning type of pricing that can get us to swap our preference from a cheaper to a more expensive option.
Governments can use nudges to influence our choices. Shutterstock

Speaking with: law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us

Law professor Cass Sunstein, on why behavioural science is always nudging us. The Conversation20.5 MB (download)
Governments and businesses are using "nudges" to influence our choices, but how? On this podcast episode, Cass Sunstein, a Harvard professor who wrote the book on nudges, unpacks behavioural science.
Your finger may hover, but it’s hard get rid of it once and for all. ymgerman/Shutterstock.com

Why it’s so hard to #DeleteFacebook: Constant psychological boosts keep you hooked

Social media provide shortcuts to things we yearn for, like connection and validation. Media effects scholars explain the psychological benefits we get from Facebook that make it so hard to quit.

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