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Articles on Pharmacology

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The pipes imprinted on microfluidic chips are about the size of a human hair, and in many ways are like miniaturizing a chemical manufacturing plant. (Katherine Elvira)

New cancer treatments can be tested in artificial cells on tiny chips the size of a postage stamp

Artificial cells on tiny microfluidic chips can provide early insight into how new cancer drugs behave in cells, and why certain kinds of cancer are more resistant to chemotherapy treatment.
Does it matter if you take your medicine morning, noon or night? That depends on a number of factors. from Kat Ka/www.shutterstock.com

What time of day should I take my medicine?

For most medicines, it doesn’t matter when you take them. But others work best at particular times.
When a pain signal gets to the brain, it lets your brain know there’s a big problem so we can respond. AAP Image/DAN PELED

Curious Kids: How does pain medicine work in the body?

In short, pain medicine is able to block the processes that cause the feeling of pain. To understand why, you need to know a bit about how pain works.
shutterstock.com

Anthill 19: Pain

Pain is something everyone experiences. This episode of The Anthill podcast explores how and why it works in our brains, what kinds of drugs are being developed to reduce pain, and whether or not robots of the future should be built so that they experience pain.
Feeling tired or being unable to concentrate is common even days after surgery. But there are simple ways to help speed up your recovery. Jason Jones/Flickr

Health Check: why can you feel groggy days after an operation?

Some people can feel drowsy or can’t concentrate days after an operation. While it’s easy to blame the anaesthetics, the real picture is usually more complicated.

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