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Articles on Political campaigns

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Eugene DePasquale, left, Democratic candidate in Pennsylvania’s 10th Congressional District, in Harrisburg, Penn., Sept. 19, shows that even the traditional handshake with voters has changed in pandemic-era campaigns. om Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

From recording videos in a closet to Zoom meditating, 2020’s political campaigns adjust to the pandemic

How do you run a political campaign in a pandemic? From data brokers to advertising firms to voter registration volunteers, the players in campaigns are making adjustments, large and mostly small.
Trump supporters fight Black Lives Matter protestors at an anti-racism rally in Tujunga, California, Aug. 14, 2020. Keith Birmingham/MediaNews Group/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images

Angry Americans: How political rage helps campaigns but hurts democracy

Americans are mad – fist-fighting, protesting mad. And that's just how politicians want voters in election season. But the popular anger stoked by candidates doesn't just dissipate after the campaign.
President Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla. had thousands of empty seats, thanks at least in part to the actions of teenagers who mobilized on the social media platform TikTok. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

TikTok teens and the Trump campaign: How social media amplifies political activism and threatens election integrity

If teenagers organizing on social media can hamper a presidential campaign rally, how challenging is it to manipulate elections?
Joe Biden’s basement bookshelf has become a familiar background for his campaign videos. Photo by JoeBiden.com via Getty Images

Amid pandemic, campaigning turns to the internet

For many years, political operatives have been perfecting their use of the internet's vast array of social media platforms, websites and digital tools.
Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign logo inspired scholars to study the role of typeface in political communication. Getty/Sebastian Willnow/DDP/AFP

Typefaces have personality – and can be political

Everything is political. And that includes typefaces, write two scholars who found that people see one group of typeface styles as liberal, another group of styles as conservative.
Seth Barnes, a staffer for Democratic presidential hopeful Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, makes calls to potential voters, Jan. 29, 2020. KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images

Iowa caucuses: It’s not just candidates who face uncertainty – it’s their campaign workers, too

What will happen to campaign workers after the Feb. 3 caucuses? It's a question that's in the cold Iowa air, carrying with it a subtle message about the state of democratic politics.

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