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Articles on Political cartoons

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Political cartoons and memes have made it clear that if there’s something to agree about on all sides of the political spectrum, its that fat people are an easy target. (Shutterstock)

Mask or no mask: Stop using fat people in political cartoons

Fat people need to be empowered to critique the very groups so willing to instrumentalize their bodies for political gain.
The New York Times decision to end daily political cartoons in its international edition has led to predictions of the death of cartooning. But the decision actually reflects an increasingly globalised, online industry. Wes Mountain/Baiducao/Carlos Latuff/David Pope/First Dog/David Rowe/Jon Kudelka/Glen Le Lievre/Rebel Pepper/António Moreira Antunes/The Conversation

The New York Times ends daily political cartoons, but it’s not the death of the art form

A New York Times decision has led to predictions of the death of cartooning. But rather than perishing, is the global art form just feeling the full force of technological and workplace change?
A wonderful evocation of the horrors of last year’s long election campaign by David Rowe in the Australian Financial Review. Amid industry turmoil, newspaper cartooning is increasingly becoming a niche activity.

Friday essay: political cartooning – the end of an era

One of the great satirical achievements of the mass media era, the editorial cartoon, is losing its centrality in the digital age. Yet the ‘visual terrorism’ of cartoons can cut through the verbiage of political commentary.
Refugee artist Eaten Fish has attracted international attention for his powerful cartoons of life on Manus Island. © Eaten Fish/Researchers Against Pacific Black Sites

The tragedy of Eaten Fish, the award-winning cartoonist on Manus Island

A young Iranian detained on Manus Island has won a prestigious international award for his cartoons reflecting life there. Our government should allow this young man to fly to the US to accept his award.
The cover of the ‘Weekly Standard’, February 2016.

There should be no monkeying about with hate speech

Two recent controversial cartoons depicting people as apes have raised an important question: what are the legal and philosophical distinctions between harm and offence?
Cartoons can inspire rage – but they can also tell the stories of the marginalised. A panel from The Arrival by Shaun Tan, Lothian Children’s Books, an imprint of Hachette Australia, 2006.

Seeing the unseen: the stories that comics help us recognise

In the month since the the Charlie Hebdo tragedy, the significance of visual representation has been a topic of much discussion. Political cartoons have the potential to reinforce problematic stereotypes…
Stéphane Charbonnier (Charb) lost his life in the Paris shooting. thierry ehrmann

In praise of the cartoonist – solitary, studious and searing

They think and work differently, cartoonists. Anyone who has spent any time in an editorial office will know that cartoonists dream and draw on their own, working to the rhythm of their thoughts – if they…

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