Menu Close

Articles on Political polarization

Displaying 1 - 20 of 30 articles

A Trump supporter and an anti-Trump demonstrator shout at each other near Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C., Nov. 14, 2020. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Can Joe Biden ‘heal’ the United States? Political experts disagree

Biden's winning campaign message was one of unity. But even the people who study polarization can't agree on whether it's possible to unify the United States.
A woman views a manipulated video that changes what is said by President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama. ROB LEVER/AFP via Getty Images

3 reasons for information exhaustion – and what to do about it

A philosopher writes about why many of us are feeling tired with the constant onslaught of information coming at us.
When science and anecdote share a podium, you must decide how to value each. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Conservatives value personal stories more than liberals do when evaluating scientific evidence

How much weight would you put on a scientist's expertise versus the opinion of a random stranger? People on either end of the political spectrum decide differently what seems true.
Talking politics increasingly seems like an exercise in talking past one another. GeorgePeters/Getty Images

Fox News viewers write about ‘BLM’ the same way CNN viewers write about ‘KKK’

Using machine learning to study over 85 million YouTube comments, a research team has, for the first time, identified linguistic differences among cable news viewers.
Something about our current moment seems to have put a particular strain on our personal relationships. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Why friendships are falling apart over politics

A recent Pew survey showed just how deep the divide has become, with about 40% of registered voters saying that they didn't have a single close friend supporting a different presidential candidate.
Both Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and U.S. President Donald Trump have been accused of using hate speech. AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

When politicians use hate speech, political violence increases

My research shows that when politicians use hate speech, it's not just empty rhetoric or political theater: Domestic terrorism increases, in the US and in other countries.
President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally on Jan. 28 in Wildwood, New Jersey. AP Photo/Mel Evans

Trump supporters have little trust in societal institutions

In a survey, Trump supporters showed the lowest faith in the Supreme Court, the federal government, the media and other pillars of society.
Days before their Oct. 28 presidential election, Brazilians protested news that supporters of right-wing front-runner Jair Bolsonaro had used WhatsApp to spread false information about his opponents. Reuters/Nacho Doce

WhatsApp skewed Brazilian election, proving social media’s danger to democracy

Facebook retired its 'Move fast and break things' slogan – perhaps because, as new research from Brazil confirms, democracy is among the things left broken by online misinformation and fake news.

Top contributors

More