Articles on Population growth

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Many people in culturally diverse populations in Western Sydney have lived in Australia for many years, if not several generations. Shutterstock

Blaming migrants won’t solve Western Sydney’s growing pains

Reasoned debates on sustainable migration intake levels are important. But transport and health infrastructure shortfalls in Western Sydney won't be solved by reactive anti-immigration attitudes.
Our national wellbeing probably peaked with Australia’s population at roughly 15 million in the 1970s, when this photo was taken in Hunters Hill, Sydney. John Ward/flickr

Why a population of, say, 15 million makes sense for Australia

Australia's GPI, a broad measure of national wellbeing, has stalled since 1974. So what has been the point of huge population and GDP growth since then if we and our environment are no better off?
Cities suffer the planning consequences of rapid population growth while the federal government reaps the revenue. Gilad Rom/Flickr

City planning suffers growth pains of Australia’s population boom

Financial benefits are behind the development industry’s push for a continuous rapid population growth. But our poorly planned cities are ill-prepared and already struggling.
A couple of months isn’t enough to say the housing market is cooling. AAP/ Tracey Nearmy

How to tell when the housing market is slowing

The housing market is too volatile to look at prices alone. If you want to understand the housing market you need to look at the wider economy.
Despite expert recommendations to adopt a population policy, Australian governments continue to resist. Scott Cresswell/flickr

Australia doesn’t have a population policy – why?

Considering all the aspects of life in Australia that are affected by population, it's remarkable that the nation doesn't have a national policy on it.
Melbourne is Australia’s fastest-growing city. Across Australia, the share of UK-born residents is declining, and the share of China-born and India-born residents has increased. AAP Image/Julian Smith

Three charts on Australia’s population shift and the big city squeeze

Melbourne is Australia's most rapidly growing city, a title it wrested from Perth around 2013-14. Several of Australia's big cities are growing well above the national average population growth rate.
New research challenges the assumption that world food production must double by 2050 to keep up with demand. The authors call for more focus on conservation through measures such as these diverse winter cover crops planted on a Pennsylvania dairy farm. Mitch Hunter

We don’t need to double world food production by 2050 – here’s why

According to widely-cited estimates, world food production must double by 2050 to keep up with population growth. New research challenges this target and calls for balancing growth with conservation.
A hiker perched at the top of Tasmania’s Tarkine wilderness. AAP Image/ Jenny Archer

There’s hope for Tasmania in the post-mining boom era

the end of the mining boom has breathed new life into parts of the Tasmanian economy. But there are also several worrying indicators -- like population growth and unemployment -- to be addressed.
Sydney’s farms on the urban fringe produce 10% of the city’s fresh vegetables. Alpha/Flickr

Urban sprawl is threatening Sydney’s foodbowl

Farms on Sydney's fringes supply 20% of the city's food. That could drop by more than half if urban sprawl isn't kept in check.
Australians are living and working longer, marrying later and earning more that past generations. Hamed Masoumi/Flickr

Australia’s changing profile: fewer divorces, higher incomes, more rental stress

Divorce rates are on the decline in Australia, people are marrying and having children later in life, and more of us live alone. Our experts respond to the new report on Australia's welfare.

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