Articles on Population growth

Displaying 1 - 20 of 61 articles

Dilapidating infrastructure and poorly trained teachers are just some of the problems plaguing Nigeria’s education system. RTI International/Ruth McDowall

Why Nigeria must get serious about primary school education

In addition to being poorly trained, Nigeria's school teachers are being outnumbered by a growing population.
As one of the fastest-growing cities in the developed world, Melbourne’s suburban sprawl has many costs. Nils Versemann/Shutterstock

Rapid growth is widening Melbourne’s social and economic divide

State and local governments can't do much about the rapid population growth in Melbourne, but they can take steps to reduce the costs of growing disparities between the outer suburbs and inner city.
In sub-Saharan Africa, upgrading water infrastructure requires substantial investment and a sustainable model. Shutterstock

Mozambique water project: insights into supply and use in a peri-urban area

Decision making on water infrastructure in peri-urban areas is challenging. But lessons have been learnt from a water project in Mozambique.
The Morrison government’s population plan looks to reduce the concentration of growth in the big cities and to raise the benefit-cost ratio of population change more broadly. Andrew Taylor/AAP

Government’s population plan is more about maximising ‘win-wins’ than cutting numbers

Population growth has pros and cons, and the Morrison government's plan is less about a change in immigration numbers than about increasing the benefits and minimising the costs.
Melbourne is a favourite destination for migrants from overseas and elsewhere in Australia. TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock

Migrants want to live in the big cities, just like the rest of us

Capital city populations are growing twice as fast as the rest of Australia, because of the employment and business opportunities and lifestyle on offer to both new migrants and long-term residents.
Traffic crosses over the Lions Gate Bridge from North Vancouver into Vancouver, B.C., in July 2015. Canada is increasingly becoming a suburban nation, with more people living in car-dependent suburbs.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadians increasingly live in the auto-dependent suburbs

It's easy to over-estimate crowding and traffic in highly visible downtown cores and underestimate the vast growth happening in the suburban edges of our metropolitan regions.
Brisbane has half the population of Sydney and Melbourne, but all three cities have very similar commute distances and times. superjoseph/Shutterstock

Our fast-growing cities and their people are proving to be remarkably adaptable

Urban growth has had much less impact on commuting distances and times than media reports would suggest. The explanations include jobs being widely dispersed and residents' adaptable decision-making.
Many are conflicted about whether the population should continue to grow and what the population of the future should look like. from shutterstock.com

Here’s what a population policy for Australia could look like

Many people think a population policy is about control – like the one-child policy in China, for instance. But modern population policies are about population-well-being.
Density is an idea sold to us by corporate developers who want to build on every last bit of green space. To fully enjoy our city now and for the future, we need more public green space.

Toronto needs more beauty in its waterfront designs

As Toronto hurtles towards its population dense future, the making of significant green communities for its waterfront needs to be urgently considered.
Purse seiner fishing in the Indian Ocean. Footprint estimates do not assess how sustainably resources such as fisheries are managed. Jiri Rezac

Yes, humans are depleting Earth’s resources, but ‘footprint’ estimates don’t tell the full story

August 1, 2018 is 'Earth Overshoot Day,' a date coined by the nonprofit Global Footprint Network to publicize overuse of Earth's resources. But their estimates actually understate the problem.
Cutting immigration to Australia will impact the country’s demographic composition, with consequences for the working age population and income tax base. Andrew Seaman/Unsplash

Migration helps balance our ageing population – we don’t need a moratorium

Politicians across the spectrum have at some point targeted immigration as a contributor to out-of-control population growth. But would reducing, or banning, immigration take pressure off cities?

Top contributors

More