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Articles on Prince Edward Island

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The health and well-being of temporary foreign workers in the seafood industry in Atlantic Canada are disregarded in favour of business and economic concerns. (Paul Einerhand/Unsplash)

Profits trump COVID-19 protections for migrant seafood workers in Atlantic Canada

Debates about public safety and temporary foreign workers continue without input from those whose health is most affected. Migrant workers themselves are largely invisible amid discussions about risk.
The Green Party’s Paul Manly celebrates after voting results come in for the Nanaimo-Ladysmith byelection on May 6, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

The Green Party wave could spread across Canada

The Green Party breakthrough in Prince Edward Island and positive result in British Columbia foreshadows the party's prospects at the federal level in the fall.
Suzanne Phillips and Adish Gebreselase are seen at Splitt Ends Unisex Hair Design, a storefront salon in Halifax that Phillips sold to the Eritrean immigrant last year. (Kelly Toughill)

How newcomer entrepreneurs are making a difference in Atlantic Canada

Provincial governments in Atlantic Canada have been trying to encourage immigrants to become entrepreneurs for more than a decade. Some are boldly answering the call.
The Atlantic Ballet Theatre will soon premier Alien, a new piece that explores the immigrant experience. Of the ballet’s 21 full-time employees, 12 are immigrants who come from nine different countries. Stephen MacGillivray/Public Policy Forum

How Atlantic Canada’s businesses are trying to attract immigrants

Atlantic Canada has thousands of available jobs with no one to fill them. Here's what various companies, big and small, are doing to attract and retain immigrant workers.
It took Anna Tselichtchev two years to love Atlantic Canada. This tree helped. Kelly Toughill

Newcomers find jobs, prosperity in Atlantic Canada – if they stay

Immigrants in Atlantic Canada have higher employment levels, higher wages and face less discrimination than other Canadian immigrants, yet the region has the lowest retention rates in the country.

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