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Articles on Propaganda

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Vladimir Putin speaks at a rally in Moscow in March 2022, according to this Kremlin image, with a banner that says “For the world without Nazism! For Russia!” Kremlin Press Office/Handout/Andalou Agency via Getty Images

Putin’s propaganda is rooted in Russian history – and that’s why it works

For hundreds of years, Russia has elevated its political leaders as figureheads. That’s part of what makes its propaganda so convincing.
Ukrainian refugees board transport at the central train station in Warsaw, Poland on April 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

#PolandFirstToHelp: How Poland is using humanitarianism to boost its propaganda

Poland has an opportunity to emerge from this refugee crisis a more united, more accepting and economically strong society, but first they need to have tough conversations about immigration.
Anastasia Parshkova holds a poster reading ‘Thou shalt not kill,’ outside Christ the Saviour Cathedral, in Moscow, on March 15, 2022. She was later arrested. (Feminist Anti-War Resistance)

Russia’s feminists are protesting the war and its propaganda with stickers, posters, performance and graffiti

Writing graffiti on bank notes, postering cities and crying on public transit are some ways members of the Feminist Anti-War Resistance in Russia are speaking against propaganda.
Cars drive past a building with a huge letter Z, a symbol of the Russian military, and a hashtag reading ‘we don’t abandon our own’ in Moscow on March 30, 2022. (AP Photo)

War-time media reporting is shaping opinions about Russia’s Ukraine invasion

The transmission of truth about the war against Ukraine is a criminal offense in Russia. Without access to the complete information about the war, Russian population continues to support it.
There is little evidence that Russia has coordinated cyber operations with conventional military operations in Ukraine. Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP

Cyberattacks have yet to play a significant role in Russia’s battlefield operations in Ukraine – cyberwarfare experts explain the likely reasons

Cyberattacks can be devastating, just not on the battlefield, according to researchers who looked at 10 years of armed conflicts around the world.
A woman looks at a computer screen as Russian state news editor Marina Ovsyannikova protests the Ukraine war during a news segment. AFP via Getty Images

Putin’s control over Ukraine war news is not total - it’s challenged by online news and risk-taking journalists

Russia is cracking down on freedom of speech and media. But other factors, like outside online information, could make it difficult to control war propaganda - and block out other information.
Genuine image of an abandoned Russian tank near the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv during this week’s invasion. But social media is rife with fake or misattributed images. Sergey Kozlov/EPA

Fake viral footage is spreading alongside the real horror in Ukraine. Here are 5 ways to spot it

Footage claiming to document the situation in Ukraine may not necessarily be genuine. Here’s how to treat viral footage with the right level of scepticism before sharing it on social media.
Russian President Vladimir Putin walks through a hall in the building housing Russia’s GRU military intelligence service. Dmitry Astakhov, Sputnik, Government Pool Photo via AP

Russia has been at war with Ukraine for years – in cyberspace

Troop buildups and diplomatic negotiations highlight the threat of a major land war in Europe. In cyberspace, Russia has been attacking Ukrainian infrastructure and government operations for years.

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