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Articles on Proud Boys

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Unemployed Blackjewel coal miners, their family members and activists man a blockade along railroad tracks leading to their old mine on Aug. 23, 2019, in Cumberland, Kentucky. Scott Olson/Getty Images

How the quest for significance and respect underlies the white supremacist movement, conspiracy theories and a range of other problems

The quest for significance and respect is a universal part of human nature. It has the potential to inspire great works – but lately, it has been much in evidence tearing society apart.
In 2020, protests like this one in Hamilton, Ont. were held internationally to support anti-racism and the Black Lives Matter movement. (Shutterstock)

Proud Boys terrorist group designation may deter new recruits and fundraising

Designating the Proud Boys and other right-wing extremist groups as terrorists will make it more difficult for them to fundraise, but it won't necessarily stop the spread of hatred.
A person wearing attire with the words Proud Boys on it joins supporters of former President Donald Trump in a march on Nov. 14, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Designating the Proud Boys a terrorist organization won’t stop hate-fuelled violence

The Proud Boys have been designated a terrorist organization in Canada. But without addressing the means of organizing, this designation won't put a stop to right-wing extremism.
Militia members associated with the Three Percenters movement conducting a military drill in Flovilla, Ga., in 2016, days after Trump’s election. After his 2020 defeat, Three Percenters were involved in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Image

Police, soldiers bring lethal skill to militia campaigns against US government

A leaked database shows at least 10% of the far-right Oath Keepers militia is active police or military – people professionally trained in using weapons and conducting sophisticated operations.
On January 6, 2021, Donald Trump addressed his supporters in Washington. Shortly afterwards, thousands of them will forcibly enter the Capitol. Brendan Smialowski/AFP

How Donald Trump’s populist narrative led directly to the assault on the US Capitol

In his January 6 speech in Washington DC, Donald Trump urged his supporters to force their way onto Capitol Hill, is a perfect compendium of his inflammatory populist rhetoric.
The Proud Boys outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2021. (Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

US Capitol protesters, egged on by Trump, are part of a long history of white supremacists hearing politicians’ words as encouragement

The protests that ended in the storming of the US Capitol included members of white supremacy groups, the latest example of such groups being encouraged by politicians to challenge government.
Pete Musico, left, is one of the founding members of the Wolverine Watchmen, as is Joseph Morrison, right. Both were charged in the plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. (Jackson County Sheriff’s Office via AP) Jackson County Sheriff’s Office via AP

Plot to kidnap Michigan’s governor grew from the militia movement’s toxic mix of constitutional falsehoods and half-truths

A scholar of militia movements describes the 'peculiar' -- and erroneous -- principles that right-wing militias subscribe to, including believing themselves to be defenders of the Bill of Rights.
There is a long history of links between white nationalist movements and the U.S. military. Bo Zaunders/Corbis Documentary via Getty Images

Americans aren’t worried about white nationalism in the military – because they don’t know it’s there

People typically underestimate how much white nationalism goes on in the military, but when they learn the truth, they're concerned.
A visitor looks at the faces of some of the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing at the Oklahoma National Memorial museum in Oklahoma City. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

19 years after 9/11, Americans continue to fear foreign extremists and underplay the dangers of domestic terrorism

The Sept. 11 bombings killed almost 3,000 Americans. But if you exclude that unique event for the last two decades of terrorist activity, a different picture of US vulnerability appears.
Joey Gibson, leader of the right-wing group Patriot Prayer, addresses a crowd on April 19, 2020, in Olympia, Washington, insisting the state lift restrictions put in place to help fight the coronavirus outbreak. Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Why are white supremacists protesting to ‘reopen’ the US economy?

Militant far-right groups are always looking to appear legitimate and to recruit more Americans to their causes.

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