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Articles on Public safety

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A nurse (left) operates a robot used to interact remotely with coronavirus patients while a physician looks on. MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Robots are playing many roles in the coronavirus crisis – and offering lessons for future disasters

Robots are helping health care workers and public safety officials more safely and quickly treat coronavirus patients and contain the pandemic. They have something in common: They're tried and tested.
England’s chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, UK prime minister Boris Johnson and the government’s chief scientific adviser Patrick Vallance hold a press conference on coronavirus. PA/Alberto Pezzali

Coronavirus: trust in political figures is at a low just as they need citizens to act on their advice

Leaders all over the world have tested their citizens to the limit in recent years. Now they need them to follow strict orders to stop the spread of infection.
Teachers can suffer abuse on the job. Krakenimages.com/Shutterstock.com

Violence and other forms of abuse against teachers: 5 questions answered

From being subjected to harassment and threats to getting assaulted or having their cars keyed, many American teachers are being victimized.
The nuclear power plant in Pickering, Ont., was the subject of a false alarm. (Shutterstock)

The fallout from a false nuclear alarm

A nuclear alarm was issued on Jan. 12, 2020. The alarm had been mistakenly sent during a training exercise and was retracted, but the impact will erode trust in public safety efforts.
Fires that affect populated areas raise different safety and public health issues than wildfires. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Why we need to treat wildfire as a public health issue in California

Two fire researchers argue that recent fires in Northern and Southern California show why health and social equity need to be part of fire preparedness.
Bright light does not necessarily make a space feel safer, as seen here where there’s a sharp drop-off into dark shadows at the edge of the path. grafxart/Shutterstock

More lighting alone does not create safer cities. Look at what research with young women tells us

Bright lighting alone does not make a space feel safe. It can blind and disorientate and create dark shadows at the edges. Tellingly, 'unsafe' places had much higher illuminance than 'safe' places.
Nearly half of female tertiary students surveyed in Melbourne say they ‘rarely’ or ‘never’ feel safe on public transport after dark. KN/Shutterstock

Students don’t feel safe on public transport but many have no choice but to use it

As they return to classes, a survey finds nearly half of female tertiary students in Melbourne don't feel safe using public transport at night. And 79% have been sexually harassed or victimised.
Scandals have dominated the recent headlines, but healthcare, education and public transport have been at the core of the policy debates. Wes Mountain/The Conversation

Victoria election: the scandals, sloganeering and key issues to watch

With just days to go before the election, Labor is making a last-minute appeal to voters to stay in power, while the Liberals are pressing for change.
The White Night festival is an example of Melbourne’s efforts to promote itself as a convivial city. John Gollings/AAP supplied

The quest for the convivial city: how do ours fare?

Australian cities generally minimise negative attributes such as crime, segregation and violence, but developing positive attributes such as inclusivity appears more challenging.

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