Menu Close

Articles on Redistricting

Displaying 1 - 20 of 22 articles

Mississippi state legislators review an option for redrawing the state’s voting districts at the state Capitol in Jackson on March 29, 2022. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Supreme Court allows states to use unlawfully gerrymandered congressional maps in the 2022 midterm elections

A ruling by the US Supreme Court to allow unlawful maps to be used in the midterm elections will affect who gets elected to the House of Representatives and may determine control of Congress.
State Sen. Joseph Thomas, D-Yazoo City, holds a copy of the proposed congressional redistricting map during debate over redistricting at the Mississippi State Capitol in Jackson, Jan. 12, 2022. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

How this cycle of redistricting is making gerrymandered congressional districts even safer and undermining majority rule

The results of the latest round of redistricting have advanced the anti-democratic trend where elected leaders choose their voters, undermining representative government.
A small sliver of a congressional district in Pennsylvania crossed four counties, on a map that was ruled to be a partisan gerrymandering plan. AP Photo/Keith Srakocic

Votes cast in November will shape Congress through 2030

When voters in November pick among the candidates for state legislatures, they are choosing the people who will make the new electoral maps for congressional elections.
The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what’s likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it’s a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.
Activists at the Supreme Court opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Want to fix gerrymandering? Then the Supreme Court needs to listen to mathematicians

Supreme Court justices have previously called statistical methods of measuring partisan gerrymandering ‘sociological gobbledygook’ and ‘a bunch of baloney.’

Top contributors

More