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Articles on Retirement incomes

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“We’d be mad not to learn the lessons” of the election result, said Chalmers on Labor’s way ahead. Joel Carrett/AAP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Jim Chalmers on the need to change economic course

Jim Chalmers on the need to change economic course. The Conversation, CC BY35.9 MB (download)
In this podcast, Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers argues the government can have both a more stimulatory policy and a surplus going forward.
Despite a slowing economy, Josh Frydenberg says ‘you wouldn’t want to be in any other economy, other than Australia’. James Ross/AAP

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Treasurer Josh Frydenberg on a slowing economy

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Treasurer Josh Frydenberg on a slowing economy
This week's June quarter national accounts showed the weakest economic growth since the GFC, but Treasurer Josh Frydenberg remains optimistic.
Increasing numbers of older Australians face a harder time paying the bills when they retire because they’ll still be paying off a mortgage or renting a home. Art_Photo/Shutterstock

Fall in ageing Australians’ home-ownership rates looms as seismic shock for housing policy

People over 65 who still have a mortgage or are renting are projected to double in number by 2031. The trend is likely to hit government budgets and leave more retirees in poverty.
Compulsory super takes money out of the government’s coffers faster than savings on the pension put it back in. Shutterstock

Boosting super will cost the budget more than it saves on age pensions

It is widely believed that compulsory super saves the government money on pensions. It does, but nowhere near enough to pay for the accompanying tax concessions. Lifting compulsory contributions will make things worse, for a century.
Despite alarming news, retirees can still rely on their retirement nest eggs. Dan Kosmayer/Shutterstock.com

Social Security’s future is safe

Social Security will have to dip into its trust fund to pay benefits this year for the first time since 1982. Should we be worried?

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