Articles on Risk

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It takes roughly 90 years for the living memory of an event to disappear. Anurag Papolu/The Conversation via AP Images

As collective memory fades, so will our ability to prepare for the next pandemic

A global pandemic might be at the forefront of everyone's minds. But we can't assume that future threats will get the attention they deserve from people living in an information-saturated world.
Behavior is changing because of the coronavirus. Is perceived risk the reason why? AP Photo/Steven Senne

Americans disagree on how risky the coronavirus is, but most are changing their behavior anyway

Using a survey taken from March 10 – March 16, social scientists tried to untangle the complicated connection between feelings of vulnerability and behavior change in response to the coronavirus.
Protective measures and their safety assurances can change how people act around risk. Alfredo Falcone/LaPresse via AP

When safety measures lead to riskier behavior by more people

Behavioral economists explain how widespread use of face masks, hand sanitizer and other preventive measures could counterintuitively encourage riskier behaviors around coronavirus.
Dale Palmer prepares his home in NSW for the bushfires. The decision to stay and defend one’s property requires a person to be mentally, as well as physically, prepared. AAP/Darren Pateman

It’s hard to breathe and you can’t think clearly – if you defend your home against a bushfire, be mentally prepared

In catastrophic fire conditions, leaving early is the only safe option. But in other conditions, one thing that's often overlooked in decisions to stay or go is how mentally tough you need to be.
Accepting a donor kidney with a small risk of carrying HIV or hepatitis B or C might be worth thinking about. from www.shutterstock.com

Organs ‘too risky’ to donate may be safer than we think. We crunched the numbers and here’s what we found

Organs from gay men or injecting drug users, often rejected for transplants, could safely be used, so long as donors test negative for infections such as HIV, and hepatitis B and C.

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