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Articles on Russian invasion

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Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a ceremony to present medals at the St. George Hall of the Grand Kremlin Palace, in Moscow, Russia, Dec. 8, 2023. (Sergei Guneyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Why Russians still support Vladimir Putin and the war in Ukraine

Polls suggest many Russians remain supportive of Putin and the war in Ukraine. Economic realities and western double standards likely play a big role.
Labeling a Russian rocket attack that killed 12 people in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, as a ‘tragedy’ sidelines human accountabilty. Yan Dobronosov/Global Images Ukraine via Getty Images

Calling the war in Ukraine a ‘tragedy’ shelters its perpetrators from blame and responsibility

Calling something a ‘tragedy’ serves to minimize human responsibility for its causes, which can be convenient for the people who are causing the ‘tragedy.’
A woman wrapped in the Ukrainian flag shouts through a megaphone during a demonstration in front of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands, in March 2022. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Why the International Criminal Court’s indictment of Putin has symbolic importance

The International Criminal Court’s charges against Vladimir Putin are likely to have a minimal impact on him, but it does signal that wartime atrocities have consequences — and the world is watching.
Ukrainian designer Margarita Chala stands next to shoes symbolizing war crimes committed against Ukrainian civilians at the Old Town Square in Prague in 2023. Michal Cizek/AFP via Getty Images

When there are no words: Talking about wartime trauma in Ukraine

Trauma can affect how people remember and describe experiences. Many survivors express their pain through objects and physical symptoms, an anthropologist explains.
European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and European Union High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell (R) light candles in the Church of St. Andrew and Pyervozvannoho All Saints during their visit to the site of a mass grave in Bucha, April 2022. Sergei Supinsky/AFP

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is proof the EU needs to get better at stopping mass atrocities

The war’s one-year anniversary is eerily close to that of an EU report on the prevention of mass atrocities. Ten years later, its authors reflect on what the bloc could have done differently.
In war, it’s not the size or sophistication of the technology, but how it’s used – especially in combinations. Elena Tita/Global Images Ukraine via Getty Images

Lesson from a year at war: In contrast to the Russians, Ukrainians master a mix of high- and low-end technology on the battlefield

A year ago, the Ukrainian military was largely equipped with Soviet-era weapons. It has since seen an influx of high-tech weapons. But it’s less what than how that’s made a difference.

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