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Articles on Satellite imaging

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This is an enhanced satellite image of Western Australia’s Great Sandy Desert. Yellow sand dunes cover the upper right, red splotches indicate burned areas, and other colours show different types of surface geology. USGS/Unsplash

These stunning satellite images look like abstract art – and they reveal much about our planet

The United States Geological Survey has a vast collection of satellite images capturing breathtaking geological features of our planet. As a geologist, I’ve picked eight of the most fascinating.
Private companies have launched dozens of imaging satellites – like the two small boxes in the middle of the photo – into orbit in recent years. NASA/Steve Jurvetson

War in Ukraine highlights the growing strategic importance of private satellite companies – especially in times of conflict

Private satellite companies have boomed in recent years, and many experts have wondered what role they would play in a conflict. They have proved to be invaluable to Ukraine in recent months.
Modern computing allows to spot isolated trees and shrubs in semi-arid areas, facilitating research on the evolution of vegetation cover. Martin Brandt

How we mapped billions of trees in West Africa using satellites, supercomputers and AI

Advanced techniques allowed our research team to build an open database of billions of individual trees and challenge some common perceptions about vegetation in arid and semi-arid zones.
Mangroves, like these in Madagascar, provide a range of benefits, including protection from storms and the prevention of coastal erosion. (Louise Jasper/Blue Ventures)

New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities

Despite their enormous value, mangroves are being removed at an alarming rate. A new tool aims to help communities reverse mangrove loss and tap into conservation programs and funding.
NASA’s James Webb telescope mirror undergoing cryogenic testing. Ball Aerospace/Flickr

Six space missions to look forward to in 2021

India may land on the Moon this coming year, while Nasa will launch its new, powerful rocket farther into space than any other human rated spacecraft.
The Caban Coch dam, in Wales’ Elan Valley, is just one of the estimated 1.2 million river barriers in Europe. Sara Barrento/Nature

Europe’s natural waterways: death by a million cuts

New research published in the journal Nature reveals that more than 1.2 million flow barriers exist on European rivers and that approximately 10% are obsolete.

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