Articles on Skin cancer

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Ouch! Here’s the evidence to bust some myths about sunscreen. Now, there’s no excuse to look like a rock lobster this summer. from www.shutterstock.com

4½ myths about sunscreen and why they’re wrong

Do you know people who cling to myths about sunscreen? Here's the evidence to convince them they're wrong.
Climate change and especially variations in the ozone layer have increased the danger from the sun’s harmful rays during the last 25 years. Children are particularly at risk. Shutterstock

Summer is here! Why you need to protect your children’s eyes

The sun emits harmful rays 365 days a year, even when cloudy or rainy. Children must be protected or they may develop cataracts at an earlier age and run the risk of skin cancer of the eyelids.
Professor Fabian V. Filipp lectures on the biology of malignant melanoma and pigmentation disease. The color of skin is due to the presence of a pigment called melanin, which can absorb cancer-causing sunlight. Photo by Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism Laboratory, Fabian V. Filipp. Used with permission. CC BY-SA.

Success of immunotherapy stimulates future pigment cell and melanoma research

An international team of researchers is probing the links between skin diseases, including cancer, to speed the search for cures.
Bright sun and fatty foods are a bad recipe for your DNA. By Tish1/shutterstock.com

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

Scientists have long thought that regions of DNA called telomeres control how long you live. We are now learning that it is your diet and lifestyle that shape your telomeres, not the other way around.
Ingredients in many sunscreens are bleaching coral and harming marine life. www.shutterstock.com

Making a cleaner, greener, environmentally safe sunscreen

Scientists have discovered a natural sunscreen – made by microbes – that may be better for humans and the marine critters they are hoping to see.
The study looked at helping redheads to tan and protect them from the sun. But the redheads were mice, not humans. from www.shutterstock.com

Research Check: can a new drug really protect redheads from cancer?

A US study into whether a new drug can give us a tan without going into the sun generated headlines around the world. Here's what the study really says.
Former President Jimmy Carter in Aug., 2015 at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Ga. Carter was undergoing treatment for advanced melanoma at the time. Via AP. David Goldman/AP

Melanoma: Taming a migratory menace

Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, can usually be cured when caught early. When it has spread, however, it becomes a challenge. Recent findings are bringing hope. Here are a few examples.
Machines don’t make the same errors as humans when it comes to decisions based on visual analysis. from www.shutterstock.com

Can machines really tell us if we’re sick?

The value of machine learning is not only that it is more accurate than humans. It is also cheaper and more consistent in its diagnoses.

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