Tennis

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Hawk-eye technology can be used to do more than just check those troublesome line calls in tennis. AAPImage/Lukas Coch

Beyond the line call: how Hawk-Eye can improve performance

The evolution of professional tennis has always been linked to the changing technology of the day. For example, the decline of the wooden racket lead to the whole new power-based style of play we enjoy…
World No. 1 men’s tennis player Novak Djokovic practises at the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, for this year’s Australian Open. AAP Image/Joe Castro

Rich rewards for those at the top in tennis, but what of the rest?

The world’s best tennis players are preparing to battle it out in Melbourne as the 2015 Australian Open gets under way this week. With rising grand-slam prize-money and better-than-ever exposure, you might…
Small hands need small sporting equipment … but what about less bouncy balls? PJMixer/Flickr

Why Santa should bring your kids the right-sized sports gear

Smaller footballs, lighter tennis racquets and mini playing fields: it makes sense to have these for children, right? Well, in recent years there’s been strong opposition against children playing modified…
One star you won’t be seeing perform in Glasgow. John Walton/PA

Why isn’t tennis part of the Commonwealth Games?

Among those of us that follow the internal workings of the Commonwealth Games, eyebrows were raised when tennis was not included in the list of sports for Glasgow 2014. Scotland has of course got great…
Nick Kyrgios' blistering serve has attracted the attention of tennis fans around the world. AAP/Julian Smith

Smashing success: the science behind Kyrgios' serve

A big serve proved its value as part of Australian wild card Nick Kyrgios’ game yesterday, with 37 aces in his fourth round Wimbledon victory over world number one Rafael Nadal. Kyrgios, the first player…
Much of Rafael Nadal’s success can be attributed to junior practice techniques. Flickr/Carine06

Different strokes: how Rafael and Tiger hit the top of their games

As Rafael Nadal moves into the Australian Open semi-finals after beating Grigor Dimitrov yesterday afternoon, it’s a good opportunity to think about how he reached his champion status and compare him with…
The Barossa in January: not always ideal cycling conditions. AAP/Dan Peled

It’s time for Australia to change its attitude to extreme heat

Complacency can kill. You would have to be living under a rock to be unaware that heat exposure can be deadly. Yet every year Australia – supposedly the “clever country” – endangers the lives of everyone…
Australian Open staff and volunteers also suffered in the heatwave. AAP

Mad dogs and tennis players go out in the midday sun

On days when the Victorian Health Department issued Heat Health Alerts warning the extreme hot weather substantially increased the risk of heat-related illness and mortality, and outside work on Victorian…
Shifting hemispheres? A good training plan must include time to acclimatise. Vox Efx

Athletes can beat the heat, even during an Australian summer

Two of Australia’s biggest international sporting events kicked off last week – the Australian Open in Melbourne and the Tour Down Under in Adelaide – coinciding with a heatwave over southeast Australia…
A different type of Grand Slam: Carlos Moya of Spain loses his cool at the Australian Open in 2005. AAP/Joe Castro

Why some players can’t keep their cool when the tennis heats up

Over the next two weeks, Melbourne Park will host the world’s best tennis players for the Australian Open. We expect the best to perform under the watchful gaze of millions of fans around the world, so…
Old is the new young, in tennis anyway: at 35 years old, Germany’s Tommy Haas is still winning tournaments. EPA/Marc Mueller

You’ll never see another teenage tennis champ – here’s why

Lleyton Hewitt won the Brisbane International last weekend at the age of 32. Roger Federer and David Ferrer, two of the world’s top ten players, are over 30. And 35-year-old crowd favourite Tommy Haas…
Andy Murray ponders the heteronormativity of Centre Court. Not enough megapixels

Game, sex, match: the gender politics of Wimbledon

On a weekend like this, tennis stars like Andy Murray are the nation’s biggest stars. In many ways, sportspeople are no different from any other celebrities - be they reality TV stars, rock stars or film…
Grunts don’t guarantee victories. Mike Egerton/PA

Grunting in tennis: what’s the racket?

Noise seems to be a bit of a problem in major sports tournaments. For many, vuvuzelas were the scourge of the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. So much so that the BBC looked into ways of muting them on…

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