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Articles on Toronto

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New DNA analysis revealed that Calvin Hoover killed Christine Jessop in 1984. Toronto Police Chief James Ramer sits next to a screen displaying photos of Calvin Hoover during a news conference on Oct. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Christine Jessop’s killer identified: Solved cold case raises questions about genetic privacy

Christine Jessop was murdered in 1984 and, 36 years later, DNA evidence finally identified her killer. But the police investigation's use of genetic genealogical databases raised questions about privacy.
A homeless woman sits outside a fenced-off camp in Vancouver after a 12 p.m. deadline for the park to be vacated in Vancouver on May 9, 2020. The province relocated hundreds of people from tent encampments in Vancouver and Victoria to hotel and community centre accommodations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Cities must end homeless camp evictions during the coronavirus pandemic

Without sufficient safe shelter space and universal testing, cities are forcing homeless people into encampments, limiting their ability to stay safe and violating international human rights laws.
New research suggests many Canadians cannot afford to forgo public transit during the COVID-19 pandemic — or ever. Jed Dela Cruz/Unsplash

Giving up public transit during the coronavirus is a luxury many Canadians can’t afford

Many of Canada's residents, including essential workers, have no choice but to ride transit. Service cuts may cripple their access to essential destinations if governments do not intervene.
Independent bookstores are places where culture is collected and disseminated. The gentrification of city centres makes their existence increasingly precarious. Kévin Langlais on Unsplash, CC BY-NC

When capitalism kills culture: Gentrified real estate puts squeeze on indie bookstores

The demands of gentrification in some neighbourhoods are proving deadly for some independent businesses, including local bookstores, often forcing them to close.
An artist’s rendering of Toronto’s shoreline in 2050. Regulating the future city poses new challenges for different levels of government. Picture Plane/Heatherwick Studio for Sidewalk Labs

Sidewalk Labs proposals put the fox in charge of the henhouse

Regulating Sidewalk Labs proposed developments poses new challenges for assigning responsibility and oversight.
Politicians from all parties should be asked tough questions about their support of Toronto’s Sidewalk Labs Quayside project while on the campaign trail. This is an artist’s rendering of the project. Sidewalk Toronto

Federal leaders should face tough questions about Toronto’s smart-city project

If governments can't get something like Quayside right, that bodes ill for Canada's digital future. The election gives us a chance to see where the parties stand on vital data governance issues.
The proposed Quayside neighbourhood in Toronto will collect data from individuals in public spaces, but getting consent is a tricky issue. Picture Plane for Heatherwick Studio for Sidewalk Labs

Sidewalk Toronto’s master plan raises urgent concerns about data and privacy

A report based on public consultations conducted by Sidewalk Labs has still not answered many pressing concerns about privacy and consent in Toronto's Quayside development.
Thousands of fans cheer as the Toronto Raptors pass by during the championship parade in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Lahodynskyj

What authorities can learn from the Raptors parade shooting

More planning time to better estimate the risks for gun violence and enact strategies like restricting crowd sizes at the end of the Toronto Raptors parade route would have served the city well.
Sydney’s Darling Harbour: popular but noisy and expensive. Here’s how we could do better to provide a safe place to work and play. from www.shutterstock.com

How Darling Harbour was botched (and could be reborn)

Cities around the world are redeveloping their waterfronts to be accessible and resilient to the effects of climate change. Here's where Sydney's Darling Harbour went wrong and what we can do better.
More than 25,000 people voted for Faith Goldy for mayor of Toronto. What does it mean? (Facebook)

The ominous third-place finish of a white supremacist in Toronto

Faith Goldy's third-place finish in the Toronto mayoralty race should not be dismissed. We must be watchful of the potential lessons that other far-right politicians may draw from her campaign.
In a political world, where words are pregnant with moral meanings, language is not innocent of racist content. Here a young man walks in his neighbourhood in Mississauga, ON. Steven Van/Unsplash

‘Thugs’ is a race-code word that fuels anti-Black racism

Toronto Mayor John Tory's use of race-coded words to describe gun violence in Toronto, including "thugs, sewer rats and gangsters," stokes racism and serves to justify policing Black communities.
Traffic crosses over the Lions Gate Bridge from North Vancouver into Vancouver, B.C., in July 2015. Canada is increasingly becoming a suburban nation, with more people living in car-dependent suburbs.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadians increasingly live in the auto-dependent suburbs

It's easy to over-estimate crowding and traffic in highly visible downtown cores and underestimate the vast growth happening in the suburban edges of our metropolitan regions.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford returns to the provincial legislature during a midnight session to debate the bill that cut the size of Toronto city council from 47 representatives to 25 in September 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Toronto must keep fighting Doug Ford – for the good of democracy

City council is a level of government deserving of recognition and autonomy. That's why Toronto must continue to fight Ontario's attempt to exert its will over the city.

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