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Articles on Traumatic Brain Injury

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San Francisco 49ers running back Jeff Wilson Jr (centre) in action against Los Angeles Rams linebacker Leonard Floyd (left) and Los Angeles Rams defensive tackle Aaron Donald (right) an NFL game in California in 2022. EPA-EFE/JOHN G. MABANGLO

Sport-induced traumatic brain injury: families reveal the ‘hell’ of living with the condition

Researchers spoke to families of athletes who had suffered from traumatic brain injuries during their sporting careers.
Sleep plays a critically important role in the recovery process in the days following a concussion. nicolamargaret/E+ via Getty Images

Concussions can cause disruptions to everyday life in both the short and long term – a neurophysiologist explains what to watch for

While high-profile concussions in the NFL have brought renewed attention to the gravity of head injuries, they can also occur on the playground or during junior varsity practices – with lasting effects.
Concussion doesn’t just happen in sports or only in teens and young adults; it affects people of all ages and backgrounds. (Shutterstock)

Concussion is more than sports injuries: Who’s at risk and how Canadian researchers are seeking better diagnostics and treatments

Canadian researchers are exploring unanswered questions about concussion: How to diagnose it accurately and quickly, how to predict outcomes and promote recovery, and how to prevent it altogether.
Over the past two decades, researchers have gained a great deal of insight into the risks surrounding concussions – some of which has led to sweeping policy changes. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images Sports via Getty Images

The risk of concussion lurks at the Super Bowl – and in all other sports

Millions of sports-related concussions occur in the US every year. Many of them happen to high school and college athletes.
An estimated 69 million people worldwide experience a traumatic brain injury every year. Iaremenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Blocking an immune system molecule in mice may help prevent long-term disabilities after traumatic brain injury

The molecule C1q has both protective and detrimental effects after traumatic brain injury. Blocking it after injury in mice restored normal brain rhythms during sleep and prevented epileptic spikes.
Male pileated woodpecker. FotoRequest/Shutterstock.com

How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?

Pecking holes in a solid wood tree trunk would give you a headache, if not serious brain damage. What special assets allow a woodpecker to do it?
New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman (11) and Los Angeles Chargers linebacker Uchenna Nwosu (42) collide during an NFL divisional playoff football game, Jan. 13, 2019, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Super Bowl: Why you don’t need an MRI to detect concussion

A standard clinical MRI is not sensitive to the distributed and microscopic injuries in a concussed brain. But new discoveries are in the pipeline.
Montreal Alouettes quarterback Johnny Manziel is tackled by the Ottawa Redblacks in Ottawa on Aug. 11, 2018. Manziel was subsequently placed under the CFL concussion protocol. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

How concussion stresses the heart to protect the brain

Recent research shows that the heart is affected when the head takes a blow, in sports-related concussion.

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