Articles on Trump impeachment

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Benjamin Franklin was a leading voice in the debates framing the Constitution. Howard Chandler Christy/Architect of the Capitol

Founders: Removal from office is not the only purpose of impeachment

The Founders saw impeachment as a regular part of ensuring presidential accountability. A constitutional scholar offers a possible process for a rapid and smooth impeachment inquiry.
U.S. President Donald Trump. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The 25th Amendment wouldn’t work to dump Trump

Those who want President Trump out of office should forget about the 25th Amendment; it won’t work as they hope or believe. The amendment is a complex law that – by design – is very hard to use.
President Donald Trump arriving at the Rose Garden, May 22, 2019, in Washington. AP/Evan Vucci

The Constitution dictates that impeachment must not be partisan

Politics have pervaded the debate about whether Congress should impeach President Trump. One legal scholar says that whether to impeach – or not – should not be viewed as a political question.
Can a country move ahead when its citizens hold dueling facts? Shutterstock

From ‘Total exoneration!’ to ‘Impeach now!’ – the Mueller report and dueling fact perceptions

How can a community decide the direction it should go, if its members cannot even agree on where they are? Two political scientists say the growing phenomenon of dueling facts threatens democracy.
Pages from Robert Mueller’s final report on the special counsel investigation into Donald Trump, which show heavy redaction by the Department of Justice. AP Photo/Jon Elswick

Did Trump obstruct justice? 5 questions Congress must answer

Mueller's report describes more than a dozen times Trump may have broken the law. Here's how Congress will decide whether the president obstructed justice during federal probes into his presidency.
Attorney General William Barr at an April 18 press conference about the public release of the special counsel’s report on Donald Trump. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

What happens next with the Mueller report? 3 essential reads

The full report on the special counsel's Trump investigation has now been made public. As people, Congress and prosecutors nationwide dig into Mueller's findings, here are three key issues to watch.
Richard Nixon flashes the victory sign on the night he received the Republican nomination for president Aug. 9, 1968 in Miami. AP File/AP Photo

Why it’s hard to remove, or even diagnose, mentally ill or unstable presidents

Some cite mental illness, or at least instability, as a basis to remove Pres. Trump from office. A doctor and a lawyer use a 1965 novel, 'Night of Camp David,' to explain why that's unlikely.
Attorney General William Barr at an April 18 press conference about the public release of the special counsel’s report on Donald Trump. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

What you need to know about the Mueller report: 4 essential reads

As the special counsel's investigation of Trump turns into a partisan battle in Congress, here are four key issues to follow.
The line of succession works like this: If Trump is removed from office, Pence takes over. If both Trump and Pence go, Pelosi would take over. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The new Congress likely won’t impeach Trump and remove him from office – here’s why

Democrats control the House and could impeach Trump if they wanted. But removing the president from office is in the hands of the Senate -- which is still dominated by Republicans.
With the Democrats favoured to win back the House of Representatives in the midterm elections, that makes impeachment of Trump more likely, right? Shawn Thew/EPA

Calculating the odds of a Trump impeachment: don’t bet the house on it

If the Democrats get close to retaking the House of Representatives in the midterm elections, the odds of impeachment are high. But the Senate remains problematic.

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