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Articles on Turtles

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The northern map turtle is listed as a species at risk in Canada. Little is known about its reproductive behaviour as it spends most of its life underwater. G. Bulté

I spy on real turtles having sex with 3D-printed turtle sex dolls

New technologies are revealing more about the secret lives of underwater turtles. Using underwater cameras and 3D printing, researchers are learning more than ever before.
Plastic bags, balloons, and rope fragments were among more than 100 pieces of plastic in the gut of a single turtle. Qamar Schuyler

How much plastic does it take to kill a turtle? Typically just 14 pieces

Autopsies of 1,000 turtles washed up on Australian beaches paint a grim picture of the impact of plastic debris. Even a single piece can be deadly, and on average 14 pieces equals a 50% fatality rate.
Green sea turtle eating seagrass off Lizard Island. Abbi Scott

Dugong and sea turtle poo sheds new light on the Great Barrier Reef’s seagrass meadows

New research highlights the role of sea turtles and dugong in the dispersal of seeds and maintenance of seagrass meadows, an important marine habitat and the primary food source for both animals.
Endangered green turtles like this one on Raine Island in Queensland’s far north face an uncertain future – one that depends largely on effective conservation measures. AAP

How can we halt the feminisation of sea turtles in the northern Great Barrier Reef?

With 99% of green sea turtles in the northern Great Barrier Reef hatching as females due to changing climate, the future for this species now depends largely on effective global conservation measures.
Turtles can’t head south for the winter, so they hibernate in rivers, lakes and ponds.

The secret to turtle hibernation: Butt-breathing

Crisp temperatures, ice-capped ponds and frozen landscapes send animals scurrying for cover. But just what do turtles do when winter takes hold?
Turtle hatchlings could be released into the Murray River to manage the sudden influx of dead carp. Ricky Spencer

Millions of rotting fish: turtles and crays can save us from Carpageddon

Millions of dead carp will fill the Murray-Darling Basin after the government releases a targeted virus. Scavengers like turtles and crayfish might help – as long as we protect them.
A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.

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