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Articles on US Civil War

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Gen. William T. Sherman on horseback at fortifications near Atlanta in 1864. George N. Barnard via Library of Congress

William Tecumseh Sherman knew the enduring cruelty of war

A career soldier and a careful scholar of the military profession, William Tecumseh Sherman knew that wars are part of human nature, and are unavoidably cruel and harsh.
A Ukrainian flag flies on a flagpole on Parliament Hill in Ottawa following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

An 85-year-old law paves the way for Canadians to fight in Ukraine

Canada has unambiguously expressed its support for those wanting to fight for Ukraine. If even a fraction of Ukrainian-Canadians decide to do so, large numbers of Canadians could soon be in Ukraine.
A trade card with printed black type for the domestic slave traders Hill, Ware and Chrisp. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

The brutal trade in enslaved people within the US has been largely whitewashed out of history

By the time slavery ended, over 1 million enslaved people had been forcibly moved in the domestic slave trade across state lines. Hundreds of thousands more were bought and sold within states.
President Lyndon Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which aimed to do away with racial discrimination in the law. But discrimination persisted. AP file photo

Critical race theory: What it is and what it isn’t

A scholar of race and racism explains what critical race theory is – and how many people get it wrong.
An editorial cartoon from 1900 shows the Populist Party swallowing the Democratic Party. J.S. Pughe/Buyenlarge/Getty Images

US third parties can rein in the extremism of the two-party system

The most successful third parties in US politics don’t typically rise to dominance, but instead challenge the major parties enough to force a course correction.
A march along historic South Road Street in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, protesting the police shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. AP Photo/Steve Helber

Protesters marching in Elizabeth City, N.C., over Andrew Brown’s killing are walking in the footsteps of centuries of fighters for Black rights

Many Americans first heard of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, when protests began after Andrew Brown Jr. was killed by sheriff’s deputies. But the city has a long history of fighting racial injustice.
Abolitionist John Brown, left, and President Abraham Lincoln, right, were both moral crusaders. Hulton Archive/Getty Images & Stock Montage/Getty Images

John Brown was a violent crusader, but he blazed a moral path that the cautious Lincoln followed to end slavery

President Lincoln was a statesman. John Brown was a radical. That’s the traditional view of how each one fought slavery, but it fails to capture the full measure of their devotion.
Pro-Trump supporters, including Infowars host Alex Jones, hold a ‘Stop The Steal’ protest Wednesday in Atlanta as Georgia’s recount nears the end. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Five reasons Trump’s challenge of the 2020 election will not lead to civil war

Much as the South rejected President Lincoln’s election with a massive armed uprising, could President Trump’s many supporters rise up and overthrow a Biden-led government?
Republican nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic nominee Sen. Tim Kaine stand after the vice-presidential debate in Farmville, Va., Oct. 4, 2016. Joe Raedle/Pool via AP

A brief history of presidents snubbing their successors – and why the founders favored civility instead

‘Mind your manners’ isn’t just something your mother told you. Manners – and civility – are an essential component of how things get done in government, and the Founding Fathers knew it.

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