Articles on US Congress

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US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on October 8, 2019. She accused the White House of an “unlawful attempt to hide the facts” after it ruled out cooperating with an impeachment probe of President Donald Trump. Andrew Caballero/AFP

Trump and Nixon: Three key differences between 2019 and 1974

The impeachment investigation of US president Donald Trump has formally started, but much has changed since 1974, when Richard Nixon was forced out of office.
Trump’s approval rating has a lower ceiling and higher floor than that of past presidents. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Investigations usually hurt a president’s public reputation – but Trump isn’t usual

Investigations often damage the president's approval rating, particularly if the inquiry drags on for a long time. But that may not matter to a historically unpopular president like Trump.
North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in December 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

The Electoral College will never make everyone happy

A quirk of mathematics gives voters in some small states, like Rhode Island and Nebraska, an extra edge over voters in other states. This happens not only in the US, but in other countries, too.
Answering constituents in congressional offices often involves tabulating comments in a database. Office of Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont. via AP

How Congress turns citizens’ voices into data points

Advancements in computer technology are changing how Congress handles citizen communication, which affects how elected officials represent their constituents.
Winning the support of workers may be key to Democrats winning the 2020 election. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

How Democrats can win back workers in 2020

Hillary Clinton arguably lost in 2020 because she took workers for granted. Will Democrats make the same mistake again?
Carvings and barbed wire illustrate the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial on Bainbridge Island, Wash. The site, designed by architect Johnpaul Jones, opened in 2011. (AP/Seattle Times/Jordan Stead)

Why Japanese-Americans received reparations and African-Americans are still waiting

Social movement theory helps to explain why Japanese-Americans received reparations but the same will be much more challenging to provide for African-Americans.
The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what's likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it's a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.
Biometrics like retinal scans is a new frontier in the privacy wars. Reuters/Mike Blake

Congress is considering privacy legislation – be afraid

States like California have been at the forefront of privacy innovation in recent decades. A possible federal law could bring their experimentation to a halt, harming consumers.

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