Articles on US President Donald Trump

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The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
Relationships can be tough. Reuters/Carlos Barria

Why Federal Reserve independence matters

President Trump has discussed firing Fed Chair Jerome Powell over the central bank's interest rate policies. Research shows this kind of political meddling is usually bad for the economy.
Australian federal police entering the Australian Broadcast Company headquarters on June 5, 2019. A.B.C. screenshot from videotape

Investigating the investigative reporters: Bad news from Down Under

An American media scholar studying in Australia looks at the protections offered by the two countries for investigative reporting, raising crucial questions about journalism's role in democracy.
U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller makes a statement on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, May 29, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Bourg

Is Robert Mueller an antique? The role of the facts in a post-truth era

What's the role of someone who, like Robert Mueller, speaks only facts in a tornado of partisan bombast? Is it a breath of fresh air or an abdication of responsibility to protect America's interests?
President Donald Trump arriving at the Rose Garden, May 22, 2019, in Washington. AP/Evan Vucci

The Constitution dictates that impeachment must not be partisan

Politics have pervaded the debate about whether Congress should impeach President Trump. One legal scholar says that whether to impeach – or not – should not be viewed as a political question.
Mitt Romney is sworn in as senator on Jan. 3, 2019 at the Old Senate Chambers in the U.S. Capitol. REUTERS/Jack Gruber-USA TODAY

Romney’s Mormon religion helps explain his criticism of Trump

Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah is one of the very few GOP critics of President Trump's character and leadership. Why has he staked out this lonely position? His Mormon faith.
A sign behind Republican members of the committee during Michael Cohen’s testimony before a House Committee Wednesday. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Michael Cohen’s verbal somersault, ‘I lied, but I’m not a liar,’ translated by a rhetoric expert

Michael Cohen wants you to know that throwing your kid a ball doesn't make you a Red Sox pitcher. So he told lies, he says, but that doesn't make him a liar. A rhetoric scholar dissects his argument.
If Cuban exiles can sue businesses operating in Cuba, it could affect flights to the country, like this JetBlue landing in Havana. AP/Desmond Boylan

Trump may seek more punishment of Cuba

Cuban exiles in the US may soon be able to sue companies that use property seized from them in the Cuban revolution. If Trump moves to allow that, it could slow economic development in Cuba.
Father and child stand outside closed National Air and Space Museum in Washington, Jan. 2, 2019. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

The shutdown: Drowning government in the bathtub

The government shutdown provided a short-term version of what some activists have long wanted: A government small enough so that you could 'drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub.'
Australia’s unspoken antipathy to experience is not new, but contrasts sharply with the attitude found in other countries such as the US. Wes Mountain/The Conversation

How Australia’s political ageism may be robbing us of our best leaders

A corrosive ageism in Australian politics overvalues the new, while discounting experience. If the US and UK can see the value in older politicians, why can't we?

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