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Articles on Vaccine development

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Samples from volunteers are handled in the laboratory at Imperial College in London, on July 30, 2020. Imperial College is working on the development of a COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Canada’s COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force needs better transparency about potential conflicts of interest

With lives depending on a vaccine, trust in Canada's COVID-19 Vaccine Task Force is crucial. Members of the task force need to make any industry links or potential conflicts of interest publicly clear.
A worker inspects vials of a SARS CoV-2 vaccine for COVID-19 produced by SinoVac at its factory in Beijing on Sept. 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Training our immune systems: Why we should insist on a high-quality COVID-19 vaccine

Our first exposure to a pathogen, either naturally or via vaccination, can affect how our immune system responds in the future to the same or similar pathogens.
Research technician Leon McFarlane handles a blood sample from a volunteer in the laboratory at Imperial College in London, where a COVID-19 vaccine is under development, on July 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Canada’s ‘me first’ COVID-19 vaccine strategy may come at the cost of global health

With $1 billion in advance purchase agreements for COVID-19 vaccines, Canada has joined the vaccine nationalists: rich countries buying up more than half the global short-term supply of vaccine.
A lab technician holds a vial of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate during testing at the Chula Vaccine Research Center, run by Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand on May 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Explainer: How clinical trials test COVID-19 vaccines

Will a vaccine for COVID-19 be safe? Animal testing, human clinical trials and post-approval surveillance give us good grounds to believe that a future approved vaccine will work and be safe.
Vaccinologists have not focused their research on tailoring vaccines to induce robust immune responses in the elderly. (Shutterstock)

Why vaccines are less effective in the elderly, and what it means for COVID-19

Immunosenescence — the decline of immune system function with age — means that vaccines are not as effective in older adults, the demographic most susceptible to many diseases, including COVID-19.
A general view during the country’s first human clinical trial for a potential COVID-19 vaccine in Soweto, South Africa. Felix Dlangamandla/Beeld/Gallo Images via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccine trial in South Africa: everything you need to know

There isn't enough clinical research being done in Africa. This has had a lot of repercussions in terms of the timing when interventions become available and effective in high income countries.

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